Persian Teaching System


The Persian Gulf electronic map
An electronic image map of the Persian Gulf.
Courtesy Mississippi State University publications.

The Persian Gulf debate

On Noveber 21, 1996 a subscriber to THE IRANIAN Bulletin suggested that Iranians should boycott KLM - Royal Dutch Airlines - because the electronic map on its inflight monitors referred to the Persian Gulf as the "Arabian Gulf". After receiving complaints emailed by Iranians, KLM announced on December 4 that it will instruct the software maker to correct the mistake.

Here are the messages, responses and reactions:

Farhad Kashani: Boycott KLM
Babak Nabili: Simple Letter
Shahram Shaida: Complaint
Babak Nassirian: Send email
Farhad Shakeri: Not urgent
Ozhang Karimi: Excellent!
Abbas Atrvash: Letter to KLM
Fariborz Haghighi: Lufthansa too
Laura Rosen: Feed the hungry
J Javid: Out of hand
A Kamyab: Isolated incident
Roxanna Bahro: Over zealous
Kamran Mousavi: Patriotism? Hah!
Kambiz Kashani: Chill out
Saeed Vahid: National identity
Farzaneh Razzaghi: Gulf of America
BB Bahmani: Don't care
Abbas Soltani: Molla Nasredin
Ali Akbar Mahdi: Consciuous distortion
Khashayar Lessan: Arabistan, Mohamareh
Haleh Nazeri: Terrorist, fanatic
KLM: Name change
Siamak Farah: Peaceful action
Jafar Javan: Community strength
Farideh Mousavi: Courage
Mohsen Shababian: Up to us
Payman Zamani: Pushing too much?
John Manley: KLM revenues
Shabnam Tabibzadeh: Solidarity
Farhad Kashani: Internet power
Jamshid Irani: Reflection


Boycott KLM

From: Farhad Kashani fkashani@wyse.com

Two weeks ago, on a company mission, I was on a KLM flight from Dubai to Amsterdam. KLM displays the map of the flight path on it's TV screens. I was surprised to see that the Persian Gulf was depicted as the Arabian Gulf on the map probably to appease the Arab passengers.

I asked to see Captain C.F.Siebers. The Captain brought his paper maps and confirmed that the true name is the Persian Gulf. He said he will bring up the issue with his supervisors and get back to me within two weeks.

Well, two weeks have passed and I have not heard from them. May I ask all patriotic people to boycott KLM flights and tell others to do the same. Let's use the power of our dollars to correct KLM.

Regards,
Farhad Kashani

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Simple letter

Babak Nabili BNabili@bangate.compaq.com

Instead of doing a silent boycott, it may be a lot more effective to bring this to the attention of KLM public relations and management.

A simple letter from you to follow up would probably be very effective. Then if you don't hear anything, we can send them lots of email. What do you think?

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Complaint

From: Shahram Shaida SHAIDAS@moc.govt.nz

I found a KLM site on the Net. the address is :

http://www.klm.nl/About/default.htm

They have an option to email them there, I have emailed them with a complaint, and I hope that other Iranians will do the same.

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Send email

From: Babak Nassirian babak_nassirian@ibi.com

KLM has a home page I urge everybody to go to:

http://www.klm.nl/About/default.htm

Click on MAIL and let KLM know how you feel.

Babak Nassirian

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Not urgent

From: Farhad Shakeri farhad@Tehran.Stanford.EDU

There is no urgency on this and Mr. Kashani should call KLM and ask for a correction. And he should follow it up.

You have to go through proper channels to fix this. And it will work.

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Excellent!

From: Ozhang Karimi ozhangk@redrose.net

An EXCELLENT idea. Boycott will show them that it is to their best interest to call The Persian Gulf by its real name.

By the way did you know that KLM stands for "Koon Laghe MosAfer"? Well this may not be polite, but in the old days that is what we called them. I hope that everyone will boycott them until they change.

Best Regards,
Ozhang Karimi

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Letter to KLM

From: Abbas Atrvash atridirect.com

Dear Mr. Kashani,

I admire your initiative and wholeheartedly support your idea of fighting KLM over using the unauthentic name of Persian Gulf. As you see my first response to your suggestion is the following letter to KLM.

Besides, I have a wide connection in the Iranian related travel industry in North America. Should KLM decide to ignore this warning, my second step would be to approach my friends who are selling KLM seats by thousands and ask them to put the pressure on.

Best regards,
Abbas Atrvash

The following letter is emailed and will also be faxed to (3120) 648 8069 at KLM head office in Amsterdam.

November 22, 1996
Mr. Leo van Wijk
Managing Director
KLM Royal Dutch Airlines
AMS/MB, Postbox 7700
1117 ZL Schiphort Airport
Amsterdam, Netherlands

Dear Mr. Van Wijk:

It is with much regret that after some time, my first communication with KLM, the airline which I always admired as one of the world finest, has to deal with a complaint.

First, allow me to remind you of a few facts:

Iran was one of the early international destinations KLM started to serve. Interestingly, your first schedule flight to far east, Jakarta, in 1929 was operated with a landing at Iranian port of Bushehr, at Persian Gulf;

2. According to an unofficial survey in 1970s, Iran was one of your lucrative markets, and your Tehran operation, with relatively smaller traffic compared to some of your other routes, ranked among top revenue generating KLM network;

3. For a long time until 1979 Iran Air and KLM enjoyed a close friendly relation as well as management and technical cooperation;

4. Presently over 3 million Iranians are living outside Iran - all over the globe - to many of them KLM is still a preferred airline. An affluent Iranian community of approximately 1.5 million is residing in North America. The majority are frequent business or other type of international air travellers, but more importanly, a great part of this community, repeatedly, travel back and forth to Iran. To my knowledge KLM has one of the two highest market shares of this traffic.

Yesterday, to my utmost disappointment I saw a message, quoted below, on "THE IRANIAN Bulletin", the most popular and widely read Iranian community bulletin on the Internet, posted by one of your passenger:

[ Two weeks ago, on a company mission, I was on a KLM flight from Dubai to Amsterdam. KLM displays the map of the flight path on it's TV screens. I was surprised to see that the Persian Gulf was depicted as the Arabian Gulf on the map probably to appease the Arab passengers.

[ I asked to see Captain C.F.Siebers. The Captain brought his paper maps and confirmed that the true name is the Persian Gulf. He said he will bring up the issue with his supervisors and get back to me within two weeks.

[ Well, two weeks have passed and I have not heard from them. May I ask all patriotic people to boycott KLM flights and tell others to do the same. Let's use the power of our dollars to correct KLM.

Regards,
Farhad Kashani]

I'm sure, Mr. Van Wijk, you will agree with rest of the world that the authentic name of the famous gulf situated south of Iran, in spite of the fact that is surrounded by Arab countries, has been and will remain Persian Gulf. Over years, this large body of water has been reffered to as Persian Gulf by numerous historians, including the Arab ones, as well as all other sources. Today, all encyclopaedia, publications, the media and the maps refer to it as Persian Gulf.

Now, somehow, someone in your in-flight service department, may be unintentionally, has used an erroneous name instead of Persian Gulf. As you see this unintelligent mistake has, rightfully, irritated the Iranian community. I'm afraid to say that Mr. Kashani's request will be taken seriously by many Iranians, unless a corrective measure is taken, with no delay. Since I personally do not like to see any unpleasant consequesces, I would, therefore, like to ask for your immediate action to rectify the situation.

I recommend that if KLM likes to make any announcements about its suitable reaction to avoid the damage, it would be most appropriate to send an email to "THE IRANIAN Bulletin" at [ jj@iranian.com (Jahanshah Javid)], where Mr. Kashani's message was initially posted.

Thank you for your personal attention, and looking forward to your early acknowledgement.

Regards,

Abbas Atrvash
Toronto, Canada

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Lufthansa too

From: Fariborz Haghighi caviar@emirates.net.ae

I am happy and proud to see that Iranians, in spite of the weakness of the Iranian government, have decided to do something about the KLM situation.

It should be noted that Lufthansa airlines is also referring to the Persian Gulf as the "Arabian Gulf". In addition, the new BMW showroom in Dubai is referring to itself as: The Arabian Gulf Mechanical Showroom.

It should be pointed out that the name "Arabian Gulf" was first used by Jamal Abdul NAsser, the [late] Egyptian president during one of his speeches.

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Feed the hungry

From: Laura Rosen lann@shadow.net

In regards to the person who wanted to boycott KLM over the "Arabaian Gulf" I have this to say: It's no wonder why the world is falling apart.

We should all spend more time doing important things like feeding the hungry and helping those less fortunate than ourselves instead of suing McDonalds over hot coffee, boycotting KLM over the Arabaian Gulf and arguing over who has the most righteous religion!

We should all get our priorities straight.

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Out of hand

From: Jahanshah Javid jj@iranian.com

The debate over the Persian Gulf and the "Arabian Gulf" has gotten a little out of hand.

A subscriber to THE IRANIAN Bulletin has written a note to an online travel page ( http://www.tripprep.com/ ) and warned them of "unpleasant consequences" and "damage" if they do not take "immediate action" to "rectify the situation. " (See below)

What is the "situation"? On one of their maps they have referred to the Persian Gulf as the "Arabian (Persian) Gulf".

I got the note below from one of the editors of this Web site. Read it. It made me angry and ashamed at how stupid some of us can be sometimes.

I know the person who made the threat and I know he did not intend any physical harm. But, my friend, think before you talk. You can go to prison for this; nevermind the damage you do to our already tarnished image.

We all want the Persian Gulf to be called the Persian Gulf. But... let's be reasonable.

Jahanshah Javid

***

Email sent by a subscriber to Travel Health Line:

I'm sure, you will agree with rest of the world that the authentic name of the famous gulf situated south of Iran, in spite of the fact that it is surrounded by Arab countries, has been and will remain Persian Gulf. Over years, this large body of water has been reffered to as Persian Gulf by numerous historians, including the Arab ones, as well as all other sources. Today, all encyclopaedia, publications, the media and the maps refer to it as Persian Gulf.

Now, somehow, someone in your Travel Health Line, may be unintentionally, has used an erroneous name "Arabian (Persian) Gulf" instead of "Persian Gulf".

Since I personally do not like to see any unpleasant consequesces, I would, therefore, like to ask for your immediate action to rectify the situation.

I recommend that if Travel Health Line likes to make any announcements about its suitable reaction to avoid the damage, it would be most appropriate to send an email to "THE IRANIAN Bulletin" at [ jj@iranian.com (Jahanshah Javid)]

Thank you for your attention, and looking forward to your early acknowledgement.

Regards,

***

Dear Jahanshah Javid

I call your attention to the messsage which we received this morning from ...

With regard to the name of the Persian Gulf on our Web site, I reviewed our files in that area of the world, and found that the Gulf is only mentioned in two places:

1. in the file on Iraq where we use the term Persian Gulf, and 2. in the file on Kuwait where it did say "Arabian (Persian) Gulf". I have now amended that to say simply Persian Gulf. Is this the location your friend was referring to?

Now I ask you, additionally, please relay my concern to this person: is there a reason why this upsets you so much that you threaten to damage us in some way?

Why don't you write in the spirit of the Internet and friendship in general by simply pointing out an error without all the anger and threats?

I visit your Iranian page and the first sentence I see there is the following...

The New Iranians: Iranians on the Net are tolerant, positive, and open-minded.

Mr. Jahanshah Javid, I see that you are the publisher of this magazine, so I'm sure you would share our anguish if someone were to find an error on your Web site and threaten you with "unpleasant consequences" and tell you that you had better correct it to "avoid the damage".

Sadly, this experience does not concur with the statement, "Iranians on the Net are tolerant, positive, and open-minded". Fortunately, I have met some wonderful Iranian people prior to this encounter with ..., so of course, I will not judge all Iranians by this one poor example.

Forgive me for calling this matter to your attention. Were it not for your e-mail address at the end of the message I received I'm sure I would never have troubled you with it.

Tom Harrison
Production Editor
Shoreland, Inc.
tom@shoreland.com

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Isolated incident

From: "A. Kamyab" kamyab@lf.hp.com

Dear Mr. Harrison,

While the Arabian Gulf does not exist, and the correct name for the gulf is the Persian Gulf, this issue should have been brought to your attention in a much more calm and friendly manner.

I am glad to hear that you've met some "wonderful" Iranian people, and that you will not judge all Iranians by this poor example. We like to think that *most* Iranians on the Net are tolerant, and open-minded, but as you aware, there are exceptions, as in any nationality.

I'd like to take this opportunity to again thank you for bringing this to our attention, and as an Iranian, please accept my appologies for this experience. I hope that you will not judge us by this unfortunate, and hopefully isolated incident.

Best regards,

A. Kamyab

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Over zealous

From: Roxanna Bahro chadorcone@pipeline.com

Dear Mr. Harrison,

I have just read the text of your letter with regards to the Persian Gulf. I am lead to believe it was upseting, at best, and menacing. I do apologize for the over zealous tactics of my fellow countryman!!

with regards,

Roxanna Bahro

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Patriotism? Hah!

From: Kamran Seyed Mousavi Mseyed.moussavi@gsa.gov

....and I'm glad I did not immediately respond to your initial instigating "Persian Gulf" bullshit call which, in turn, you had received from a phony Iranian "Patriot" on a KLM flight. How does it feel now to be reminded by Tom Harrison that there are conventions and protocols which are to be kept and followed in human interactions (that is if you consider yourself one,) and you just don't open your mouth to spill doodoo on other people, over a lousy, yes LOUSY, name. Who are we kidding?

These bozos who complain about "Persian" vs. "Arabian" caption, are mostly the ones who don't even know a thing about the Iranian geography let alone it's past history. Patriotism? please get real. For most of our beloved countrymen, the slogan "cho Iran nabaashad tan-e man mabaad," is more "agar man nabaasham mikhaam sad-saal siyaah hishkee nabaasheh."

Besides, there are more, as it's been brought to your attention, pressing concerns than a mere caption. Furthermore, you and your magazine, are representing more than you/yourself, so YOU need to be more carefull about what YOU promote, on behalf the rest of the Iranian community. You need to promote this: "LETS LOOK INSIDE FIRST," the rest is deception. They (the Westerners) automatically consider us THUGs, lets not give them the opportunity to prove us as such.

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Chill out

From: Kambiz Kashani kashani@lainet.com

Unfortunately, many Iranians are more concerned with appearances than substance and this is just another example, many of which abound.

What does it matter if some outfit wants to call something by another name? It's not really a life or death issue. If I could, I'd like to suggest to all offended parties to get a collective life and maybe to try and chill out a bit.

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National identity

From: Saeed Vahid vahid@neda.net

Ms Laura Rosen,

If you are Iranian and still say [we should care more about the hungry rather than the Persian Gulf], then what I can say is: I'm deeply sorry to see there are people who can be so "neutral" about their country and identity.

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Gulf of America

From: Farzaneh Razzaghi farzaneh@panam.edu

Miss Rosen,

Why don't you start calling Gulf of Mexico ''Gulf of America'' and see what kind of reaction you will get?? This is a priority. These people are talking about history. But yet, over two thousand years of history is not easy for everyone to understand.

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Don't care

From: Behrouz Bahmani btc19@mail.idt.net

I am this close to pulling myself off the list sometimes, but this is entertaining I admit!

I wish [the person sho sent a message to that online travel page] could feel the debate from our side though, so he could temper his arguments, learn from his mistake, and allow all of us to reaffirm the fact the one of us frequently speaks for all of us, and all of us don't particularly care about the Persian Gulf vs Arabian Gulf on one outdated map of a third-rate European has-been country!

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Molla Nasredin

From: Abbas Soltani abbas@terraport.net

Dear Humans,

I have been following the Persian vs. Arabian Gulf debate for a few days now and it makes as much sense to me as the Iranian vs. Persian does. First, I have to admit that I didn't like the fact that the Persian Gulf was called the Arabian Gulf....but so what? The Arab countries have been calling it the Arabian Gulf for years but so what? The Turks, Persians and the Arabs have been claiming ownership of Molla Nasredin....but so what? I speak to at least 40 Americans and Canadians on the phone at my job daily and none of them has been able to get my name, Abbas, right yet...but so what?

Come on people, let's get real!!! We always talk about the American arrogance and their narrow view of the world but we are guilty of the same things.

Persian Gulf to me will always be PERSIAN but if anyone intends to express his lack of knowledge by calling it Arabian, well let them. I am on this earth to live my life and police my own activities not the lack of intelligence of others.

Regards

Abbas Soltani a.k.a. Isfahani

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Conscious distortion

From: Ali Akbar Mahdi AAMAHDI@ee.net

I am surprised by the shift in reactions to the question of "Persian Gulf." Now, everyone is sorry for making a big deal out of nothing! Well, let's put this in perspective:

1. No one should cross the bounds of civil discourse, no matter how serious the issue under discussion. The only way one establishes a meaningful dialogue is through mutual respect and understanding. If poor language is used, it is too bad. However, a wrong does not become right just because it is not addressed appropriately. We need to separate the question of "Persian Gulf vs. Arabian Gulf" from inappropriate lanague and tempere used in this case.

2. The fact that there are many poor people around the world and our country is faced with serious problems of poverty, disease, alienation, oppression, etc., DOES NOT change the nature of the problem under discussion. Sure, it is a matter of priority and each person can set that for him/herself. Each problem has its place in both public discourse and public policy. One can address any one of these issues without ignoring the other.

3. The question of Persian Gulf vs. Arabian Gulf is more than semantic. It is a matter of public policy and has serious historical, geopolitical, and international significance. If the change of PG to AG was an unintentional mistake by an individual or a corporation, the matter would not have been serious and it would take a polite reminder to solve it. However, when it is a part of a systematic effort to distort the history of a country in order to establish political claims, then it is a different matter. Yes, since the beginning of the Iran-Iraq war and the development of hostilities between Iran and the Arab countries in the region, it has been a CONSCIOUS and CONCERTED effort of the Arab countries to change the name of the Persian Gulf to Arabian Gulf. Why? Once they change the name and get away with it, then they can justify their claims to three islands in the area. The matter is not a trivial one. That is how the boundaries of many countries in the area were changed. That is how imperialists in the 19th century reshaped the political map of the region to their favor. That is how territories were taken from some countries, borders were expanded in some cases, and sovereinties were denied. If interested, please see any history book on the disintegration of the Ottomans and the emergence of the modern Middle Eastern countries.

4. Many Westerners are unaware of these matters and often quote the words of whoever is providing them with the information about the region. Depending on whom they are talking to, they may hear "Persian Gulf" or "Arabian Gulf". Politicians from many of the Gulf countries have begun to use "Arabian" instead of "Persian." When one sees such a usage in mass media, all it takes is a polite reminder to the editor/reporter/interviewer, etc. However, when you see a map, you need to take it more seriously and find the source. Here, there is more than innocence involved. You need to report the case and make sure the person using the map is aware of the distortion built into it. Furthermore, one needs to find out who made the map and contact him/her and find out why such a mistake had occured. Of course, all this can be done peacefully and respectfully.

Peace and regards,

Ali Akbar Mahdi

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Arabistan, Mohamareh...

From: Khashayar Lessan lessa002@gold.tc.umn.edu

May I respond to Laura Rosen's comment that instead of spending our energy to correct the wrong usage of 'Arabian Gulf' to 'Persian Gulf' we should try and help the needy and hungry. True, it is also important and very benevolent to help the needy but don't forget that the root cause of the problem of the starving and needy lies first and foremost in politics. I have a feeling that most of the famine and hunger in Africa, for example, are rooted, amongst other things, in tribal conflicts and exploitation by clonial powers in the past and multi-nationals at present. Similarly the issuse of 'Persian Gulf' is a political one and one should not underestimate its potential to cause conflict or be used as an excuse for conflict and war. Let me explain:

Prior to his September 1980 invasion of Iran, Saddam Hussain of Iraq had done his homework. Thus, other than his military prepration, in Iraqi school text books and media the name of Iran's Khuzestan Province was changed to Arabistan, Khoramshahr to Mohamarah and the Persian Gulf became the Arabian Gulf and these are probably still in usage in Iraq and in other Persian Gulf Arab states. He also laid claim to three of Iran's strategic islands: the Greater and Lesser Tombs and Abu Musa. Incidentally, UAE has all of a sudden woken up and decided that these islands belong to her. The latter remains as another potential source of conflict in our region, and we already know how costly these can be.

Although I am not and don't claim to be an Iranian nationalist, but do take pride in my fellow Iranians sensitivity towards this issue, regardless of their political differences. Let this be a focal point for the convergence of our common interests.

The Persian Gulf is undoubtedly the world's most important waterway and carries almost 70% of world's oil and as such is the world's jagular vein and Iran's too. It is an issue of vital national security to Iran and no matter what government is in power in Tehran, the Persian Gulf will remain Iran's life line. Historically it has always been known as the Persian Gulf and documented as such. The Persian Gulf is and will be bound to Iran by virtue of its geography and history. And it is not just KLM that is dubiously ignoring to use the correct term. I know for a fact that nearly all British news agencies, TV and newspapers, hypocritically refer to the Persian Gulf as merely 'The Gulf' to please the Arabs and may be not to offend the Iranians too much by omitting the 'Arabian' part. These people knowingly or unknowingly are doing a great disservice to world peace and regional security. The task is much greater than we thought.

Khashayar Lessan

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Terrorist, fanatic...

From: Haleh Nazeri Lunaleh@aol.com

It's truly interesting what we choose to be passionate about in the Iranian community -- we who usually walk the other way when we see an Iranian walking towards us on the street, in the mall, anywhere, we who sit on our fancy computers debating inconsequential matters when contextualized in the bigger realm of things, while everyone we love is living in difficult and painful times in Iran, we who debate words and arbitrary geographical matters with a zest and dedication, while ignoring the fact that Congress is trying to take away legal and illegal immigrants' rights in this country [U.S.].

If we are going to take the time to write to each other and to people around the country about a topic, why don't we make it something worthwhile to the people all around us, rather than promulgating the existence of something as sketchy as an "Identity".

Why don't we strengthen the weak Iranian community in this country and try to change the West's unfortunate perception of us? In the end what does it matter if they call [the gulf] Persian or Arabian if all we are to them is a bunch of fanatics, terrorists, and backward fundamentalists? If we want to put so much time into changing words, shouldn't it be those?

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KLM: Name change

From: Sophie Vossenaar brand@KLM.NL

To: THE IRANIAN Bulletin
From: Sophie Vossenaar,
KLM Royal Dutch Airlines
Manager Inflight Communications

Amstelveen, Dec. 4 1996 We were very sorry to learn about your unhappiness with KLM and its flight tracking system in particular. First of all, please accept our apologies for any discomfort this may have caused you. KLM would never want to deliberately upset any of its passengers.

Second, our software on the flight tracking system is basically a "ready made", "off the shelf" product, that can be customized to a lesser or larger extent. So far, our department was not aware of this specific issue regarding the Arabian versus Persian Gulf. Last week we have contacted the supplier of our software, however, and have requested for an immediate update without the Arabian Gulf reference.

We can now inform you that this update will indeed be made for us in the coming week. After we have received the new software at ours we will immediately start updating the system. As this needs to be done per aircraft please accept that this will take a few weeks. We hope that we have solved this matter to your satisfaction this way and that we may shortly welcome the Iranian community once again as loyal KLM customers .

Best regards,

Sophie Vossenaar
Manager Inflight Communications

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Peaceful action

From: Siamak Farah siamak@InfoStreet.com

I guess this is testimony to the fact that by taking peaceful, yet firm actions, results can be delivered. No need to threaten humans, just attack pocket books and you will get immediate attention.

My hat's off to the gentleman who initiated this and special thanks to those who did not blow this out of proportion and maintained their poise just by threatening to boycott the use of KLM as an airliner.

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Community Strength

From: Jafar JavanJafarjavan@aol.com

I just wanted to congratulate all the folks who participated in this initiative. It's good to know that a little mobilization can go a long way, and in fact it demonstrates the strength of a community.

Good job.

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Courage

From: Farideh Moussavi F.Moussavi@mds.qmw.ac.uk (F.Moussavi@mds.qmw.ac.uk)

As an Iranian, I would like to thank KLM for their responsible reaction to the demand of our community. Dutch people have been known for their courage, tolerance and their independent sense of judgement throughout history, whether in religious, political or humanistic affairs.

This proves, once again, their great sense of understanding and fair judgement.

Farideh Moussavi

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Up to us

From: mshabani@chass.utoronto.ca

First, I think people should be very proud of coming together and making this change possible. Having practically no state of our own anymore, it is up to us to defend our heritage. It is good to know that there are still Iranian patriots lurking around. KLM should also be thanked by us, as a community, for recognizing its error and taking steps to correct it. But, the greatest gratitude is to THE IRANIAN for making this outcome possible by providing the medium. Thank You!

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Pushing too much?

From: Payam Zamani Payam.Zamani@jpl.nasa.gov

I am encouraged by KLM's message.

I wonder if it is worth contacting the software supplier so that they can make the correction for all of their customers?

I am willing to followup, but also feel that sometimes pushing too much kicks the wheel out! Any thoughts!

Payam Zamani

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KLM revenues

From: John Manley manley@caprica.com

It's amazing what a corporation will do to avoid losing revenues. Serves them right. Good work on this one!

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Solidarity

From: Shabnam Tabibzadeh stabibza@pioneer.arc.nasa.gov

The correction is great and others taking us seriously is even more important. This shows how solidarity can work. Congratulations and thank you and everyone, including myself!

We should now thank them for their prompt response.

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Internet power

From: Farhad Kashani fkashani@wyse.com

Thanks for your message and using your Bulletin services to get the message around. This shows the power of internet and being united. God bless those people who sent emails and faxes to KLM to make the point.

Regards,
Farhad Kashani

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Reflection

From: Jamshid Irani jamiran@geocities.com

The Persian Gulf saga which went on for a couple of weeks has been most interesting. It has also been illuminating the way we Iranians collectively go about getting results.

In reflection I found the whole episode very educational for me to know my own psychie as an Iranian, and urge everyone to take a minute to reflect on this and get to know our collective self a little bit better.

Respectfully
J. Irani

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Related

"Gulf War" II: Debating the media's deletion of "Persian" from the "Persian Gulf".(March/April 1996 issue of THE IRANIAN).


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