Archive Sections: letters | music | index | features | photos | arts/lit | satire Find Iranian singles today!

Thoughts

Hamid's blog
A world gone mad

By Hamid Boroumand
March 24, 2004
iranian.com

Emails sent to iranian.com in the past few weeks:

Sanity

Dear editor salam,

The world needs to stop blowing-up blind and deaf elderly cripples confined to wheelchairs, and the world needs to stop blowing-up commuter buses filled with civilians. Why, all of a sudden, does it seem like the world has gone mad?

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

Stirring the pot

Dear editor salam,

If the Federal and State governments are not in the business of legislating marriage or civil unions and choose to turn a blind eye to homosexual unions, will they tolerate a natural and religiously sanctioned right to those individuals seeking to have more than one legal wife (this may be particularly appropriate for those who wish to legitimize an existing or potential polygamous relationship versus having a "legal" wife and an "illegal" wife or mistress.)

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

PS: How is this for stirring up a pot of controversy?

Professionalism

Dear editor salam,

Good leadership demands good management, and good management demands a cadre of professional, skilled, educated and qualified personnel. I think countries looking to advance in today's world should create and generously fund, by acts of Parliament, elite public educational and training institutions to promote professionalism, education, competence and skill in at least a few basic spheres: Public Administration, Business Management Administration, Law and Justice Administration, Public and National Security Administration, Science Engineering and Technology Administration, Health Services Administration, and International Relations Administration among others.

If I am not mistaken, France- which has a system of governanace based on strong central government control- has created a series of highly rated public Haute Ecoles (Higher Institutions) through which most of its cadre of public servants are culled, and which have created a foundation for professionalism and skill through-out its public bureaucracy. Maybe France should be a model to emulate.

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

Chi az jooneh shoma mikham?

Dear editor salam,

In response to "feelers" being sent asking "chi az jooneh ma mikhay", and at the risk of sounding like a broken record:

First: I don't hate Iran and I do love Islam, but I do viscerally dislike mollas and akhoonds and their "pa-dos".

Second: My simple public demand is the recognition that Iranians don't need "qayems" and are "shayesteh" of conducting their affairs in a democratic and consultative manner without the interference of imposed and unelected entities and personalities. I also expect the honest implementation of this vision.

Third: My simple private demand is one of justice: 

(1) elements within the current regime treacherously conspired to murder my relative, Dr. Abdolrahman Boroumand, after indicating a desire to resolve their differences peacefully. Those responsible for this "najvanmardegy" need to be identified and brought to justice.

(2) after the Revolution of 1979, the honor and work and toil of over five generations of my family were impugned, destroyed and seized subject to the ruling of a criminal individual placed in a position of authority. This injustice needs to be reversed, and damages need to be compensated for.

(3) I expect a full public apology for the unjustified treatment accorded my family over the course of the past 25 years.

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

Payame Noroozi va Payame Qur'ani

Dear editor salam,

On the eve of the Persian New Year, a beautiful tradition in our culture as old as Time itself and worthy of much of the attention and happiness and joy and celebration attached to it (particularly the opportunity to catch up with family and friends), and after having extended wishes of well-being to all of our compatriots, let us all start this Norooz and all Noroozes with a positive attitude and the remembrance of this equally beautiful Qur'anic verse (from Surah Al-Hujarat 49, Aya 13):

"O mankind! We created you from a single pair of a male and a female, and made you into nations and tribes that you may know each other (not that you may despise each other.) Verily the most honored of you in the sight of God is he who is the most righteous of you, and God has full knowledge and is well acquainted with all things."

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

Political endorsement

Dear editor salam,

I would first like to encourage those Iranians residing in the United States who have not yet applied to become naturalized American citizens to do so immediately. Thereupon, I would encourage every single eligible Iranian American to register to be able to vote, and to subsequently educate themselves about issues and candidates, and to finally participate (without exception) in all elections and voting campaigns.

Having said the above, I wish to make the following political endorsement for the upcoming U.S. presidential election. I would like all Iranian Americans (Republicans, Democrats and Independents) who would like to see a substantive change in Iran's condition within the next four years, to unequivocally support the upcoming presidential campaign of George W. Bush with an understanding that in return Mr. Bush will embrace Secretary of War Donald Rumsfeld's position on how to effectively deal with the molla in Iran.

A clear message needs to be sent to the Bush administration that we Iranian Americans favor a popular and democratically elected government in Iran, not the current tyranny that has been imposed on our people and country. It should further be made clear that we Iranian Americans are not in agreement with the "appeasement" stance contemplated by Undersecretary of State Richard Armitage and his group whatsoever, and that any continuing efforts in the direction of cutting deals with the molla are highly unpopular with our community and will be costly for this administration in terms of votes and financial support from our community.

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

The last khan

Dear editor salam,

I must admit that it is with a certain sense of sadness that I look around myself and see the scattered remnants of my social class; the old landed Persian aristocracy or "khans" have been reeling from one heavy blow after another beginning with Reza Pahlavi's "qasb" of their domains in the 1930's, continuing with Mohammad Reza Pahlavi's failed/fraudulent land reform policies of the early 1960's, and continuing most recently with the akhoonds' theft of anything nailed (or not nailed) down.

In my immediate circle, I can identify only one family- the Ahmadis (khans of Azari extraction) - who retain that certain genuine quality (hard to describe to those who don't know what to look for, but broadly identified as "noble" or "honorable") that identifies them as belonging to that social class. The truth is that the genuine* khans are now few and far between, and with the passing of time and generations that certain "noblesse oblige" that identified the best of them will disappear, much to the detriment of our community.

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

Note that I only extend the label of "genuine" to and only recognize those khans who embody nobility and honor, not those identifiable as criminals and renowned for oppression, cruelty and corruption (and there were many.)

Playing with fire

Dear editor salam,

Can any of your readers relate to my temporary fascination with matches and combustion as a young boy of about six or seven, I don't think I can be the only one of that age who set the yard of the house we were living in on fire (thank God it didn't occur to me to try and ignite the residence itself.)

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

What unemployment?

Dear editor salam,

When the rule of law returns to Iran and relations normalize with the United States, I will personally attempt to convince Boeing Corporation to establish a major international manufacturing hub in Shahinshahr with the stated objective of creating at least 50,000 high paying technical jobs (with many times that number if Boeing's major suppliers are also factored in) for Iranian workers.

In anticipation of that day, I would encourage Iran's government to (1) make the necessary infrastructure investments in the region to accomodate such a project (2) establish a number of high quality local technical colleges - modeled after those in Germany- from which Boeing can source qualified personnel, and (3) be prepared to extend up to a 10 year tax holiday to make the proposition more attractive to Boeing Corporation.

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

Baku and Azerbaijan

Dear editor salam,

I was doing some geneological research recently and discovered something very interesting. Azerbaijan (or the northern part of Azerbaijan which is now a separate country with Baku as its capital) was until 1805, when the land was forsaken by Iran's Qajars and occupied by Russian invaders, loosely affiliated with Iran under the rulership of the Shirvan Khans. The Shirvan Khans were the product of the Javanshir clan, a fiercely independent and combative Turkic tribe, which routinely battled both the Russian Czars and Iranian Qajars.

A Javanshir family with Tabrizi origins still exists in Iran -in fact- my maternal grandmother is from that family. It would be nice to have northern Azerbaijan return to the fold of Iran, hopefully when Iran itself is free and democratic, and conditioning that the northern Azerbaijanis themselves are agreeable to it.

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

Magar kashk ast?

Dear editor salam,

NOTE: THIS OBSERVATION BROUGHT TO YOU COURTESY OF CARTEL"VAR" BONYADS AND BAZARIIS (which reminds me: will the outgoing Majlis finally release their investigation -for worldwide distribution on the internet- on the corruption that has plagued the Bonyad Mostazafan?)

Has anyone been to a supermarket recently and checked up on the price of Kashk? It may not be as inexpensive and cheap as common parlance may suggest.

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

General mobilization and the keys to paradise

Dear editor salam,

I wanted to write to express how extremely proud I am of the determination and solidarity and compassion of our Iranian community, within and outside of Iran, in response to the tragic earthquake that ravaged the city of Bam. The initial and continuing concern for the victims of that disaster appears to have been overwhelming. Some people would give the keys of paradise to a simple young boy to walk through a minefield in an unjustified war, I would give the keys of paradise to the compassionate young (or old) person who collected a "care" package for a helpless orphan and needy family halfway around the world.

In the continuing drive to strengthen our bonds as Iranians and to once again display our solidarity and caring for one another in the face of seemingly insurmountable obstacles, I would like to urge a general mobilization and the opening of a new front in a new battle: let us make a collective effort to end the scourge of smoking in Iran, because a healthy Iranian is a productive Iranian, and because the well-being of every Iranian is important to their children, parents, siblings, neighbors, friends, and co-citizens. As such, I would like to challenge Iranians to cut their consumption of cigarettes and other tobacco products by at least 50% this year, and at least 50% every year thereafter until our society and people are rid of this poison which is so harmful and damaging to both personal and national health and wealth.

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

Who is Bagher Dehghanzadeh?

Dear editor salam,

Who is Bagher Dehghanzadeh? A simple man -previously a night watchman- from a village in the heart of Iran, now approaching his eighties if not well into them, and losing his sight. But a man dear to my heart with more character than any other Iranian I know, and a man who embodies those rare qualities called "loyalty" and "gratitude." A man from such humble origins yet with such noble demeanor.

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

Javaherlal Nehru's wisdom

Dear editor salam,

The other day I was reminiscing about an old family photo album which contained pictures of slain Indian Prime Minister Indira Ghandi's visit to Iran in the mid-1970's. On this particular visit the Indian Prime Minister honored my family with a short stop at Shahinshahr to catch a glimpse of a working model of Iranian private enterprise in the agroindustrial and homebuilding spheres, and there are pictures of my father- in his younger days- greeting Mrs. Ghandi.

While I look back and think how flattering it must have been to have received a visit from a respected and world renowned leader, I wonder if any Iranians have taken the time to visit, absorb, and replicate what Mrs. Ghandi's father, Prime Minister Javaherlal Nehru, created and which has since become the pride and engine of India's worldwide technical prowess: the multi-campus system of the Indian Institutes of Technology. Nehru and his wisdom were truly a Javaher to his land and his people.

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

Iranian portfolio

Dear editor salam,

To those of your readers who follow the financial markets: I recently compiled a list of a number of publicly traded companies which I was able to identify as either being founded by or being led by Iranians or Iranian Americans and I monitor them under the "Iranian Portfolio" label, I am sure this list is not exhaustive and if any of your readers know of others I would appreciate hearing from them so I can add them to my list. Listed by symbol, they are: EBAY, SABA, STEC, NXLCQ, WFII.

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

Note: NXLCQ and STEC, in that order, are particularly compelling TO ME (having said that, please do not invest in anything without first consulting your financial and/or legal advisor and please do not invest in something just because I find it compelling to me.)

Rahbar & Akbar: The Aristide option?

Dear editor salam,

The latest round of parliamentary elections and the widespread universal boycott of those elections by Iran's citizenry constituted a proxy referendum and established the illegitimacy of Iran's existing regime in the eyes of the majority of Iran's voters. The denial of legitimate forums to establish opposition to and implement tangible changes in a "beemar" system increases the likelihood of vocalization of dissent and its metamorphosis into violent and armed struggle and resistance.

I think it would be an appropriate time for Iran's citizenry and the international community to start looking for a couple of villas in some distant African lands to accommodate Rahbar and Akbar in order to preempt inevitable violence, bloodshed and chaos.

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

Healing the rift

Dear editor salam,

I ask Muslims, of both the Shii and Sunni persuasion, if they are sincere and brave enough to believe in and embrace the word of Allah? In Sura 3 (Ale-Imran), Aya 102-105 we read:

"O you who believe, Fear God as He should be Feared, and die not except in a state of Islam."

"And hold fast all together by the Rope which God (stretches out for you), and be not divided among yourselves; and remember with gratitude God's favor on you, for you were enemies and He joined your hearts in love, so that by His Grace you became brethren, and you were on the brink of the Pit of Fire, and He saved you from it. Thus does God make His Signs clear to you, that you may be guided."

"Let there arise out of you a band of people inviting to all that is good, enjoining what is right, and forbidding what is wrong: they are the ones to attain felicity."

"Be not like those who are divided amongst themselves and fall into disputations after receiving Clear Signs: for them is a dreadful Penalty."

In this spirit of unity and healing, I would like to extend an invitation to Muslims of the Shii and Sunni persuasion to make today the start of a reconciliation that is long overdue. Invite one another to each others' homes, share meals, become friends, and attend one another's occasions of happiness and sadness, attend one another's places and ceremonies of worship with love and respect, and not with malice and hatred. It may surprise you to find how many true Muslims reside on each side of this "divide."

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

Halaliyat

Dear editor salam,

Are other individuals of Iranian heritage as confounded by the concept of "halaliyat" as I am? "Halaliyat", if I am not mistaken, occurs when someone intentionally damages or hurts you (typically it involves something premeditated and illegal or immoral, like someone thieving your property, maliciously slandering you, running-off with a man/woman you might be engaged to, etc.) and then asks you to exonerate their actions, without penalty or remuneration or punishment, by acknowledging -to the perpetrator- that what they did was okay in your eyes?!?! Generally, "halaliyat" seems to be a formality because even when it is not extended to the perpetrator it doesn't seem to modify their behavior or conduct...which might lead one to ask what the point is for the perpetrator to seek "halaliyat" anyways, after all how can one be an ethical or moral crook?

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

Personal hygiene

Dear editor salam,

The other day a distant memory reappeared in my thoughts, it was the memory of the one and only time I and my brother, aged 10 and 9 respectively at the time, went to a communal afternoon masjid prayer in a middle class area of Tehran in 1978, and our interesting experience there. We had traveled to Tehran from Esfahan, as we did a couple of times a year, to visit members of my mother's family who resided in the capital. I don't exactly recall what I and my brother were doing alone in that particular neighborhood-if we had gone together to visit a store and buy some stationary or if we had tagged along with one of our "da-yees" on some business that he was attending to- but I do recall my sibling and I being alone and near a masjid and hearing the "azan" and seeing a large group of people head towards the masjid.

Feeling particularly mature and pious at that very time and spot, my brother and I looked at each other and thought it would be a good idea to join the crowd for the prayers in the masjid. "Damaghet Rooz Bad Nabineh (or Boo Nakoneh in this instance)", never in my life have I and my brother had our senses assaulted by such rancid and foul smelling odors as those we experienced- caught between the crowd and the exit of the masjid- that day, and for nearly twenty minutes we suffocated, gagged and nearly threw-up while waiting for the prayers to end so we could flee the scene of the nastiest smelling feet, socks, and shoes in the universe. Needless to say, I and my brother never attended another communal prayer session in a public masjid in Tehran after that harrowing experience (granted we haven't been back since 1979.)

Having recounted this experience, I ask your readers to look at Surah Al-Maidah (5), Ayat 6 to -in fact- reinforce that the Qur'an, despite common norms, does establish that "cleanliness is next to Godliness." Notably, we read "..O you who believe, when you prepare for prayer, wash your faces, and your hands (and arms) to the elbows; rub your heads (with water); and (wash) your feet to the ankles. If you are in a state of ceremonial impurity, bathe your whole body. But if you are ill, or on a journey, or one of you comes from offices of nature, or you have been in contact with women, and you find no water, then take for yourselves clean sand or earth, and rub therewith your faces and hands..  God does not wish to place you in difficulty, but to make you clean, and to complete his favor to you, that you may be grateful."

If the akhoondeh mambar can't impart this basic message to those going to the public masjids for communal prayers, then it should come as no surprise that they can't aspire to lead a nation competently, either.

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

Nuclear realities

Dear editor salam,

With the free flow of technical and scientific knowledge and information, it is inevitable that-sooner or later-countries like Iran will possess nuclear weapons (to think otherwise is just plain unrealistic.)  As such, the question that the world at large needs to ask itself is that given this very real (and likely very near) possibility who does the world want to support and see at the helm of a nuclear armed country like Iran? 

Would the world at large prefer a nuclear armed Iran governed by an educated, rational, moderate, refined and legitimately elected leadership with a grasp of the deterrent and security aspects of nuclear weapons, or would the world at large prefer to see a nuclear armed Iran governed by a gang of low-life low-class hooligans, bandits, murderers, thugs and thieves ready to resort to any form of nuclear blackmail to maintain their recent hold on ill-gotten wealth and power (let me refresh your memories with flashbacks of Saddam and his Fedayeen if you have forgotten what I mean by unqualified and opportunistic jack-booted scum.)

The world has to make its decision and has to make its decision quickly, because it will be alot harder to remove the trash from Iran once that trash gets its hands on the Bomb...IS EUROPE LISTENING?????

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

Tolerance

Dear editor salam,

Sura Al-Jassiyah (45.) Ayats: 14-15:

"Tell those who believe to forgive those who do not look forward to the Days of God: it is for Him to recompense (for good or ill) each people according to what they have earned."

"If any one does a righteous deed it enures to the benefit of his own soul, if he does evil it works against (his own soul). In the end will you (all) be brought back to your Lord."

In short: MOZAHEM MARDOM NASHAVID

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

Thank you Tehran

Dear editor salam,

Let us begin the day by thanking the majority of the citizens of Tehran for respecting the call for the election day boycott and for letting the Nezam know what Tehroonis think (or don't think) of "Rahbar and Akbar". I look forward to extending a similar note of appreciation to citizens of all the other large cities of Iran (excepting perhaps Mashad and Qom) for having let their feelings be made known LOUD AND CLEAR. Yes, this was a proxy referendum!

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

Charity. Make it a habit.

Dear editor salam,

It is true, the old saying that "you can't take it with you"...after all, have you ever seen a hearse with luggage racks? I speak from personal experience when I say that nothing matches the "high" one receives when giving FREELY, HABITUALLY, IN MODERATION, and WITH ANONIMITY to a worthy or needy cause. I will vouch that habitual charity is a potent cure for the disease of greed, and I will vouch that habitual charity is a function which benefits the giver as much as the receiver.

Consistent with this personal experience and also in line with the Muslim philosophy of Zakat (interestingly, this term implies "purification" of the balance of one's income and wealth upon the disbursement of this compulsory charity by people above certain income and wealth levels- suggesting that one's income and wealth have yet to be "purified" prior to the disbursement of this compulsory charity) and the Muslim tradition of Sadaqeh (non-compulsory charity), I would encourage those of your readers who are financially able, and who wish to experience that aforementioned "high", to make it a habit to allocate up to 2.5% of each gross paycheck amount and 10% of any capital gain secured through a purchase and sale PROMPTLY BUT THOUGHTFULLY AND WITH DIGNITY to someone in real need (beginning with needy but not immediate relatives, needy neighbors, needy friends, needy orphans, and needy strangers) and for worthy causes.

For Muslims, Zakat is to be distributed to other Muslims, though Sadaqa can be distributed to non-Muslims. Also, in the spirit of "not being able to take it with oneself" I would encourage those of your readers who are financially able and have fulfilled their debt obligations to take to heart the Muslim tradition of leaving upto 30% of their estates upon death (leaving 70% to their heirs) to needy individuals and worthy causes, an excellent candidate for such charity might be helpless and needy orphans, a segment of society much referred to in the Qur'an, and the individuals and insitutions which support them.

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

And the final tally is....

Dear editor salam,

Independent final reports coming out of Iran suggest that participation in the latest round of parliamentary elections are hovering between 10% and 15% of the eligible voter base (consistent with the results that opinion polls were indicating.) So I would have to say that the final tally is:

Iran: 65,000,000
Rahbar and Akbar: 0

Now, if I am not mistaken, the initial objectives of the boycott were: the removal of Khamenei, the removal and prosecution of Rafsanjani and his mob, and the dissolution of unelected shadow entities. Now, lets add to that the preparation of the groundwork for a nationwide referendum to formalize the results of the proxy referendum that we just experienced.

To drive the point home, just in case the Nezam still has not gotten the message, I would like to ask the people of Iran to organize a mass peaceful nationwide work stoppage and demonstration spanning the days between April 15th and April 25th in honor of the thirteenth anniversary of the cold-blooded murder of my relative, Dr. Abdolrahman Boroumand, at the hands of this regime's assassins.

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

Statistical truths: Opinion polls don't lie

Dear editor salam,

Granted that the electronic poll run by the hamehporsi.org website is skewed towards a typically younger, better-educated, and computer savvy selection of potential voters, statistically the size of the sample used in the poll (over 3000 responses from Iran and over 3000 from around the world) suggests that with 99% accuracy less than 10% of the younger, better-educated, and computer-savvy group of Iranians within and without the country support the existing Nezam in its current form, and that more than 90% want some form of change.

Now I don't mean to come across as being elitist, but if I cared about my country and the opinion and desires of its young and upcoming generation I would be giving these figures a real hard look.

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

Catch-22

Dear editor salam,

I thought I would share an interesting story with your readers: after 14 years and approximately 250,000 miles (on the original engine) I finally made the difficult decision of parting with my trusty Honda Accord (yes, someone actually paid me $2,000 for the car and has told me they are very pleased with the vehicle.) My old Honda was a reliable automobile that was as dear to me as my favorite pair of worn jeans and old sneakers, and nearly as dear as the comfy couch I like to stretch out on sometimes to watch TV.

The main reason I decided to sell my car was that it was getting shabby and sort of run down, and I found that in making sales calls on my business clients I needed to park my car blocks away from my clients' offices (and prying eyes) in order to deny reality and maintain the image of business success that goes along with having a relatively new and shiny car (which I didn't have, of course). Also it was virtually impossible to use the vehicle to haul clients to business lunches or elsewhere without getting some interesting (mainly condescending but invisible) reactions from them.

So one day, recently, when one of my subcontractor crews was doing some work at an auto dealership park I popped into one of the adjoining dealerships and gathered the courage to sign a lease on a new and respectable looking sedan. All proud and puffed-up, like the father of a newborn baby, I drove off of the dealership lot in a shiny new leased automobile thinking that I had now solved a burdensome problem but not knowing the dilemma that awaited me.

Now, ladies and gentlemen, here is the catch: I still find myself facing the same dilemma of parking my brand new and shiny car blocks away from my clients' offices, and I still feel reluctant to offer my clients a ride in the new vehicle, the reason being that I now sense that the immediate thought running through my clients' head is not that of pity and feeling sorry, but that of : "if he has this new and shiny vehicle then he must definitely be overcharging me for his services!" The experience reminds me of the story I once heard of an Azari businessman who worked in the bazaar and who upon buying a new pair of shoes would immediately sprinkle dust over them so his clients wouldn't feel they were being overcharged...does anyone know where I can find a car-dust service?

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

PS: If you haven't guessed my heritage from this story, then you should know that I am half Fars (Esfooni from my father's side) and half Azari (Tabrizi from my mother's side.)

Prisoner of conscience

Dear editor salam,

How about turning up the heat a little on assassins and torturers? Check our this link:

Amir Abbas Fakhravar, freelance journalist and prisoner of conscience

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

Chera...?

Dear editor salam,

Can any of your enlightened readers tell those of us in the dark why Iranian women who wear "chadors" in public wear black chadors? I had the opportunity to witness many nationalities and ethnicities and races on a unique trip to perform the Haj in Mecca a number of years ago (an unsurpassed experience I would recommend to everyone at least once, and one which I hope to have the opportunity to experience again), and among the most beautifully clad pilgrims I observed were West African women in stunning vegetable-dyed clothing spanning the colors of the rainbow...how refreshing!

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand

Completing the Circle. Surah Al-Tawbah (9). Verses 31-35

Dear editor salam,

To those of us who are students of history, we know that modern Europe broke itself from the superstition and ignorance and backwardness and enslavement of the Dark and Middle Ages, and eased itself into the Age of Enlightenment and Renaissance which preceded today's Age of Industry and Technology when Martin Luther, a dissident man of God, challenged the hierarchy, dogmatism, and corruption of the established Church and Clergy of his time and encouraged people to think for themselves and free themselves from the shackles of dry tradition and imposed tyranny.

Well, "dry tradition and imposed tyranny" seem to have afflicted mankind through the course of history, and may (if not kept in check) afflict humanity through the end of time. I know that in referring to the Qur'an Surah Al-Tawbah (9), verses 31-35 [definitely track this down on islamicity.com for a good translation] I am returning to a theme that I have revisited before, but I can not help but stress that if we look at the Qur'an as a book of history, it addresses the issues that Martin Luther grappled with 900 years before his time, and if we look at the Qur'an as a book of divine revelation, it addresses an issue that mankind may be challenged with through the end of time.

As I think I have mentioned before, the aforementioned verses should be looked at it the context of today's Iran with the labels "ahbarahom and rohbanohom- priests and anchorites" referring to present day mollas and akhoonds. To those debating whether they should participate in or boycott Iran's upcoming elections (see: hamehporsi.org for a current opinion poll), I would encourage them to think on this piece of Qur'anic wisdom with deliberation.

Va salam,

Hamid Boroumand .................... Say goodbye to spam!

* *

COMMENT
For letters section
To Hamid Boroumand

* Advertising
* Support iranian.com
* FAQ
* Reproduction
* Write for Iranian.com
* Editorial policy

ALSO
By Hamid Boroumand
Features
in iranian.com

RELATED
Opinion
in iranian.com

Diaspora
in iranian.com

Book of the day
amazon.com

Against All Enemies
Inside the White House's War on Terror--What Really Happened
By Richard Clarke

Copyright 1995-2013, Iranian LLC.   |    User Agreement and Privacy Policy   |    Rights and Permissions