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Opinion

Collective sneeze
"If Iranians just sneeze together, it would be a hurricane to destroy the regime."

By Megabiz Irani
January 12, 2004
iranian.com

As I watched Lord of the Rings: the Return of the King, the movie that I had impatiently waited to see, in a local movie theater, I was amazed to realize what this breathtaking epic could teach us. Even though this epic perhaps reminds us of Ferdosi's Shahnameh (Book of Kings), one can also learn lessons of dignity, unity, courage, patriotism and hope for the future of our beloved homeland Iran.

Unfortunately, our country is still in darkness, as the malicious powers of the Islamic Regime destroy Iran, the heritage of our great ancestors, in order to fill up their evil long pockets, yet sadly we have shown in the past few years that we are unable to unite against the government in domestic movements.

As a student in Tehran, I remember most of us including myself could not do anything when the police and the militant groups invaded the dormitory of Tehran University.

In reality, people showed a little support and cooperation. In my own family, I was kept away from unrest, but when finally my father and I decided to join, it was too late. It seems most of us have been unable to let go of the fear in order to display a stronger popular resistance in Iran.

Supporting the resistance is not being agree with destroying banks, looting museums, or killing people in the country. What we always complain is the lack of domestic leaders in our homeland, but when it comes for our support most of us including myself would either step away or hide in closets.

Yes, at the arrival of Shirin Ebadi in Iran, people brought flowers, hold poster, and chanted slogans, but what causes a change in Iran is the popular willing to stand up not just in a particular occasion. Supposedly, many see Ebadi as Frodo who destroys the ring while the rest of us rest and shamelessly watch her.

Of course, freedom is hard to achieve, but with "who cares" or any other phrase like this nothing will happen.

We should be proud because for the first time in modern Iranian history, someone has finally received the prestigious Nobel Prize. Even though this award could bring some short-term international attention and support toward Iranian resistance in achieving freedom, but in the long run Iranians, inside and outside of country, are the only major factor that could bring any change to the current political system in Iran.

I never forget what a friend of mine told me long time ago. He once said, "If Iranians just sneeze together, it would be a hurricane to destroy the regime."

I've not forgotten the days when Khatami was elected president. Many imagined he would lead the country to a better political condition, and I recall how I was opposed by many when I disagreed on their childish dream and criticized the reforms under him who later was mostly silent on key problems facing the Islamic Republic. As I had expected not much happened, and he later showed he is just like other beneficiaries of this regime.

Sadly, some of us just dream of a powerful hero who would free us with his or her magical power in a night, yet in reality each of us is responsible for our future. Why should we hope for an American invasion of Iran? All of us are masters of our destiny and that of our land. Evil is strong, but we are stronger if all us stand up regardless of the help of the East or the West. We can make a difference if only we stay united.

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