Happy Saadi Day!

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M. Saadat Noury
by M. Saadat Noury
20-Apr-2012
 

 


 
In Iran and many countries around the world, the famous Iranian poet Shaikh Mosslehedin Saadi Shirazi (1184-1283) is annually commemorated on Saadi Day, which coincides with either 20 or 21 April.
 
Saadi was born in Shiraz, the capital city of Fars province. When Saadi was about twelve years old, his father passed away and the family came under the protection of Saadi’s uncle who had a small shop in Shiraz. With the help of his uncle, Saadi completed his early education in Shiraz. The end of his elementary education coincides roughly with the invasion of Central Asia by Mogolian Chingiz Khan. At a young age, he left Shiraz for Baghdad to study literature and sciences at the Academy of Nezaameyyeh. It is recorded that he was in the Academy between 1195 and 1226. Saadi liked to travel, and lived much of his life as a wandering dervish. After Baghdad he traveled the region for nearly thirty years. He went to Shaam (Syria), Phelesteen (Palestine), Hejaz (Arabia), Yaman (Yemen), Messr (Egypt) and Rum (Roman Anatolia or Turkey), which was in Byzantine control at the time.
 
He wrote the Orchard (Boostan) in 1257 and the Rose Garden (Gollestan) in 1258. Boostan is an exquisite piece of didactic, which is comprised of ten sections of verse, each a dissertation on wisdom, justice, compassion, good government, beneficence, earthly and mystic love, resignation, contentment, and humility. Gollestan consists of a cycle of eight rhymed-prose partitions each interspersed with poetry. The themes discussed include the manners of kings, the morals of dervishes, the preference of contentment, the advantages of keeping silent, and so on. He wrote short stories and poems about his adventurous life in both his major works. There is also a Divan, or collection of his poetry. His famous poem on Humanity focuses on the empathy of all humans. That poem has been used to grace the entrance to the Hall of Nations of the UN building in New York City, NY. The Persian Text and the English Version of Saadi’s poem on Humanity can be viewed online.
 
Saadi died in his hometown of Shiraz. Even from the very early days after the poet’s death, the tomb of Saadi in Shiraz became a place of pilgrimage to lovers of poetry and literature. "The tomb of Saadi of Shiraz will scent of love, even a thousand years after his death". That line of poetry composed by Saadi, inscribed on the gate leading into the garden surrounding the tomb, welcomes all those who enter to pay homage to this master of the Persian Poetry and Literature.

Happy Saadi Day!
 
Manouchehr Saadat Noury, PhD

مجموعه‌ ی گٔل غنچه‌های پندار

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more from M. Saadat Noury
 
مآمور

ای جان بذار من هم یکبار فکل کراوتی بشم!!!

مآمور


آره عزیز من هم موافقم!! ضعیف تر از اپوزسیون ایرانی در دنیا نیست! پست تر بی رحم تر از حامی اپوزیسون ایرانی اسرايیل نیست!!
پیدا کنید اهریمن را!! 

I wear an Omega watch


anglophile

من در این قسمت با اسداله موافقم

anglophile


Worst evils have always come when people try to HIDE their weaknesses, their wickedness, their ture desires. When an incomplete man tries to impose his version of "perfection", his version of "god", his version of tyranny on the world." This is exactly why I never fear to reveal my Anglophilic alliances and never claim to be perfect.  I am sure our good friend Divaneh feels the same. If only Asdola would follow his own advice.  

Shazde Asdola Mirza

برای مثال: نحوه تقدیم کتابش به شاه "فلان"

Shazde Asdola Mirza


 

مرا طبع از این نوع خواهان نبود

سر مدحت پادشاهان نبود

ولی نظم کردم به نام فلان

مگر باز گویند صاحبدلان

که سعدی که گوی بلاغت ربود

در ایام بوبکر بن سعد بود


Shazde Asdola Mirza

Saadi is a mix of good & bad ... truely human, but always honest

by Shazde Asdola Mirza on

Honesty is Saadi's greatest asset and appeal.

Saadi's language is simple, because he is honest, and avoids using complicated words and terms; which less honest writers may use to hide their weaknesses.

Saadi's stories are honest. He does not picture himself as a saintly and pure mullah, even though he was a "sheikh". He does not praise the king as god or god's shadow, to earn big money. He does not treat us like childern, to be fooled and deceived through dishonesty.

Dear Divaneh,

Worst evils have always come when people try to HIDE their weaknesses, their wickedness, their ture desires. When an incomplete man tries to impose his version of "perfection", his version of "god", his version of tyranny on the world.

Saadi may have been many things ... but he was a truely honest human being. And honesty is what our world has always needed the most.


anglophile

دوستان

anglophile


  به احترام سعدی اجازه دهید حریم سعدی دستخوش امیال شهوانی نگردد. 

divaneh

حواست باشد شازده جان

divaneh


شازده جان جان حواست باشد که این مامور بچه باز است و خودش راه جهنم را خوب می داند. ایشان در بلاگ فرد در مورد بچه باز ایرانی در برزیل مرقوم فرمودند که آنهایی که از این بچه باز انتقاد می کنند حواسشان باشد که فردا تابستان می شود و خودشان هم بچه ها را در لباس تابستانی میبینند و دلشان می خواهد و پیش وجدان خودشان شرمنده می شوند. یکی باید به ایشان بگوید آنچه باید شما را پیش وجدانتان شرمنده کند هوس آمیزش جنسی با کودکان است. 


مآمور

سوال آقا معلم!

مآمور


شما وقتی می گوید ٓ ره‌ این است ‌ای برادر تا جهنم!" منظورتان این است این راه به جهنم ختم میشود یعنی دارید اخطار می دهید به بردار خود ؟ یا اینکه دارید ضمن نشان دادن راه جهنم که گویا خیلی گوگولش کردید! به بردار خود آرزوی دیدارش را هم تا جهنم دارید؟؟
یعنی یا رفتی جهنم و برگشتی حالا داری پند و اندرز می دهی!! یا اینکه عازم آنجا هستی!!

I wear an Omega watch


mousa67

happy saadi day to all iranians

by mousa67 on

thank you sir for this most educational blog. enjoyed reading it.


Shazde Asdola Mirza

Saadi a Dedicated Muslim? Demo hallucinating again on Pot Day?

by Shazde Asdola Mirza on

"طریقت خواهی از سعدی بیاموز

ره‌ این است ‌ای برادر تا جهنم!"


Mehrban

با سپاس فراوان

Mehrban


سرآن ندارد امشب كه برآيد آفتابي

چه خيالها گذر كرد و گذر نكرد خوابي

 

به چه دير ماندي اي صبح كه جان من بر آمد

بزه كردي و نكردند موذنان صوابي

 

نفس خروس بگرفت كه نوبتي بخواند

همه بلبلان بمردند و نماند جز غرابي

 

نفحات صبح داني ز چه روي دوست دارم

كه به روي دوست ماند كه برافكند نقابي

 

سرم از خداي خواهد كه به پايش اندر افتد

كه در آب مرده بهتر كه در آرزوي آبي

 

دل من نه مرد آنست كه با غمش بر آيد

مگسي كجا تواند كه بيفكند عقابي

 

نه چنان گناهكارم كه به دشمنم سپاري

تو به دست خويش فرماي اگرم كني عذابي

 

دل همچو سنگت اي دوست به آب چشم سعدي

عجبست اگر نگردد كه بگردد آسيابي

 

برو اي گداي مسكين در دیگری طلب كن

كه هزار بار گفتي و نيامدت جوابي


divaneh

لا ابالی چه کند دفتر دانایی را

divaneh


با سپاس از دکتر گرامی برای بزرگداشت سخندان برجستۀ ایران. این هم یکی از زیبانرین ابیات شعر فارسی:

لا ابالی چه کند دفتر دانایی را

طاقت وعظ نباشد سر سودایی را 


All-Iranians

Pederasty In post-Islamic Persia

by All-Iranians on


M. Saadat Noury

Great Observation Dear Anahid

by M. Saadat Noury on

"Perhaps contrary to what the links note, women during those times were resourceful and able to get out of house and drink wine with Hafez".

For more on Pederasty, please see the Comment Section of this blog: http://iranian.com/main/blog/m-saadat-noury/first-iranian-masters-persian-poetry


Anahid Hojjati

thanks for the links

by Anahid Hojjati on

 There is nothing wrong with men liking men but as a woman, one appeal of Hafez 's poems for me is its romantic appeal. But to know that these poems were probably about young boys, reduces romantic appeal of them for me. Perhaps contrary to what the links note, women during those times were resourceful and able to get out of house and drink wine with Hafez.


M. Saadat Noury

Dear Anahid

by M. Saadat Noury on


M. Saadat Noury

Dear AI

by M. Saadat Noury on

Thank you for the link; please accept this in return

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saadi_(poet)


Anahid Hojjati

Did Saadi like Boys?

by Anahid Hojjati on

Some friends in their e-mails have written about this, so I would like to know what your opinion is. They even quoted few lines that supposedly indicated that Saadi liked young boys.


M. Saadat Noury

Dear Anglophile

by M. Saadat Noury on

Thank you for your commet; please accept this in return

http://ganjoor.net/saadi/divan/robaees/sh137/


M. Saadat Noury

Dear AI

by M. Saadat Noury on

Thank you for your commet; please accept this in return

http://ganjoor.net/saadi/divan/robaees/sh145/


M. Saadat Noury

Dear Demo

by M. Saadat Noury on

Thank you for your commet; please accept this in return

http://ganjoor.net/saadi/divan/robaees/sh119/


anglophile

Thank you Dr Sadaat Nouri

by anglophile on

On this great day please accept this poetic gift from Saadi which was an inspiration to Hafez:      

مشتاقی و صبوری از حد گذشت یارا

گر تو شکیب داری طاقت نماند ما را

باری به چشم احسان در حال ما نظر کن

کز خوان پادشاهان راحت بود گدا را

سلطان که خشم گیرد بر بندگان حضرت

حکمش رسد ولیکن حدی بود جفا را

من بی تو زندگانی خود را نمی‌پسندم

کاسایشی نباشد بی دوستان بقا را

چون تشنه جان سپردم آن گه چه سود دارد

آب از دو چشم دادن بر خاک من گیا را

حال نیازمندی در وصف می‌نیاید

آن گه که بازگردی گوییم ماجرا را

بازآ و جان شیرین از من ستان به خدمت

دیگر چه برگ باشد درویش بی‌نوا را

یا رب تو آشنا را مهلت ده و سلامت

چندان که بازبیند دیدار آشنا را

نه ملک پادشا را در چشم خوبرویان

وقعیست ای برادر نه زهد پارسا را

ای کاش برفتادی برقع ز روی لیلی

تا مدعی نماندی مجنون مبتلا را

سعدی قلم به سختی رفتست و نیکبختی

پس هر چه پیشت آید گردن بنه قضا را


 


All-Iranians

Great blog

by All-Iranians on

Thank you for sharing.


Demo

Ethernal Happy Days!

by Demo on

Everyday is a happy day by reading Saadi's poems! Needless to add that he was a dedicated Muslim & that many of his thoughts were stolen 300 years later by Shakespeare!

May GOD bless his soul.