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Argo Wins Golden Globe - This is another side to that Story.

Last night the Movie Argo won the Golden Globe for Best Motion Picture and Best Director. The movie captures the intensity of the rescue of the 6 Americans that were hidden by the Canadians. However, it compresses much of the story for the sake of telling the story. But anything that comes from Hollywood is thus...and the complete story is never ... Read the full article...

Balatarin

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LadyMacbeth

LadyMacbeth

Thanks for sharing part of your story Thom. We had a few American neighbors in Iran whose children I was friends with. I wasn't around before or during the revolution and have often wondered how they must have felt then, as well as how they feel now. Looking forward to reading more on your perspective.

ayatoilet17

ayatoilet1 B.S. from Argooz U., M.S. from Massachosetts I.T. PhD from Oxfed U; Post Doc @ Kharvard U; Big Shot @ Sheikh Mir Hassan Bank. Plays for a band: Ayatoilet & the Shits. The Supreme Dr. Ayatoilet Kh Kh Kh! www.ayatoilet.com

The letter/story brought tears to my eyes - seriously. We all long for the day when we can love each other again - as two nations with genuine warmth for each other. I know today, that the U.S. was misled into the "Iranian" affair for the profit and gain of its so called allies. It was a mistake - we all know it. Iranians love Americans - and those Americans that got to know Iranians love them too. This is a simple reminder of all that. I really hope, American Policy makers take the time to consider their real needs and objectives and do NOT get sucked in again by their stupid, lazy and ruthless allies that simply want to steal what is NOT theirs, and are unwilling to work hard to create real value and thus honest profits. Thank you for posting this. We need much more of these letters posted - real reminders that those Americans that do know Iranians - love us. Iranians need some love ...after all the bullshit these past 30 years.

amirparvizforsecularmonarchy

amirparvizforsecularmonarchy I Love Waterfalls and Find One of the most humorous things in the world; is the notion that Americans are a greater force for good & more civilized than Nazi's, Mullahs and Communists.

Like I was asking,

Is it true that the movie is laced with factual errors of a political nature, out right fabrications and misrepresentations?

3dculturekid

3dculturekid

See my reply to your question below. Have a great day :)

amirparvizforsecularmonarchy

amirparvizforsecularmonarchy I Love Waterfalls and Find One of the most humorous things in the world; is the notion that Americans are a greater force for good & more civilized than Nazi's, Mullahs and Communists.

Thom I was reading a response/review to Argo and wanted to get your feed back on it. After reading it I didn't want to bother seeing the movie what are your thoughts?

Here is the comment:

On the Movie ‘Argo’
November 22, 2012
As we approach the 34th anniversary of the 1979 Iranian Revolution, the commercial
success of Ben Affleck’s film Argo is a timely reminder of the great tragedy that severed
relations between Iran and the United States. During most of the 20th century these two great
countries enjoyed generally cordial and constructive relations.
It is baffling that after 33 years of the Islamic Republic, with its dreadful record on human
rights, abuses and excesses, the director found it necessary to open Argo with a distorted
and one-dimensional picture of life in Iran before the revolution. Understandably, Argo is not
a documentary. But it is a motion picture which purports to re-enact true events about recent
Iranian history. Mr Affleck told Interview magazine that he went to special lengths to achieve
historical accuracy, to the point where he considered traveling to Iran (he said he was
dissuaded from making the trip by his studio and by the US State Department). "I wanted to
go - just for research - very badly,” he said. “I really wanted to be accurate.”
Yet very little about the first few minutes of Argo can be described as accurate. Over the
years, the Pahlavi era has been hailed for its successes and criticized for its failings. Some
criticisms are fair, others are not, just as some are truthful and others have no bearing
whatsoever on reality. This is part of the natural process of trying to understand our
collective experiences. All societies examine and re-examine their histories. We also
understand that life on the public stage invites scrutiny. Nonetheless, Argo pushes the
boundaries of fairness and truthfulness beyond what some would regard as acceptable
norms even for a Hollywood movie.
The history of the Pahlavi era and pre-revolutionary Iran is presented in Argo from the
vantage point of a series of cartoonish vignettes. The vignettes contain some surprising (and
surprisingly basic) factual errors and inaccuracies:
- The film claims that in 1953 a democratically elected prime minister, Dr Mohammad
Mossadegh, was overthrown in a plot which installed the Shah on the Peacock
Throne. In pre-revloutionary Iran, the Prime Minister was always appointed after
receiving a vote of confidence from the Parliament. Dr. Mossadegh was appointed to
his post by the Shah in 1951 and then again in 1952.
- The Shah did not become king in 1953—he had already been on the throne since
1941 (following the ouster of his father at the hands of the British and Russians).
- The accusation that the Shah was a “puppet” of the West and particularly the
Americans is an old canard disproven by the most recent scholarship. To the
contrary, the Shah was a strong nationalist whose ambitions led to protracted and
intense disagreements between Tehran and Washington over the direction of Iran’s
foreign and domestic policies.
- The Shah’s consort and widow, Queen Farah, did not bathe in milk. The absurd
statement that the Shah’s personal meals were flown to Iran by Concorde from Paris
is pure fabrication. Does anyone seriously believe that the Shah of Iran was so bereft
of a decent meal in a country renowned for its splendid cuisine that he actually
imported his personal meals? The reality was very different. The Shah’s dietary
habits—he was allergic to certain foodstuffs including caviar—and his natural
modesty meant that he preferred simple local dishes.
Quite aside from Argo’s factual errors, there is the issue of how Mr Affleck depicts the
Iranian people. The Iranians who stormed the US Embassy in Tehran in 1979 and held
American diplomats hostages committed criminal acts. We, as Iranians, were then and will
always be ashamed of what they did. We do not wish to be associated with these acts. Nor
will we allow ourselves to be defined by what the Islamic Republic did in the years following
the fall of the Pahlavi dynasty. 33 million Iranians (Iran’s population in 1979) did not commit
acts of murder and terrorism. 33 million Iranians did not chant, “Death to America!” or take
Americans hostage.
The record shows that from a very early date many millions of Iranians were appalled at the
excesses of the Khomeini regime and horrified by its violations of international and domestic
law. The tragic reality is that many of the same Iranians who initially marched against the
Shah and cheered when he left the country later bitterly regretted their earlier opposition. If
they could turn the clock back, believe me they would. They understand that Iran during the
Shah’s 37-year reign, whatever its blemishes, made enormous strides that today can barely
be comprehended. They lament the massacres of innocents, the stoning of women, the
blatant economic mismanagement and widespread corruption, the cruel fate of children
ordered to walk through minefields to clear them of explosives during the Iran-Iraq war, and
so many other abuses and excesses. They remember that their king refused to turn the
army’s guns against his own people and that he left for exile rather than instigate a
bloodbath.
Whatever the intentions of Argo’s director—and I do believe Mr. Affleck’s intentions were
and are sincere—his film perpetuates the unfortunate contemporary stereotype that Iranians
somehow “hate” Americans. Nothing could be further from the truth. American visitors to Iran
bear witness to the fact that the Iranians they meet go to special lengths to receive them with
hospitality. It is unfortunate that young Iranians feel they have to prove to foreign visitors that
they are human, that they are not monsters, that they are not haters, and that just like young
Americans they too share similar dreams of a better life and aspire to build a better world.
Imagine what it must be like to start life from that point at that tender age—to feel that you
have to somehow prove that you are not a hatemonger or an extremist? It is a burden that
too many young Iranians carry with them.
Like many Iranians, I look forward to a time when we can look at the Shah’s reign and the
tragic events of the revolution in a calmer, more reflective way. I think most fair-minded
Iranians will appreciate that the director’s brief and absurd portrayal of the queen as some
sort of Persian Cleopatra in no way diminishes her passionate advocacy in support of
women’s and children’s rights, nor does it trivialize her on-going efforts to champion Persian
culture and the arts. Her life now, as then, remains dedicated to serving the welfare and
wellbeing of the Iranian nation.
Mr Affleck is certainly entitled to his viewpoint and artistic license. He presumably
understands that there are risks involved in trying to interpret another country’s history and
experiences. That does not mean he should not have made the film. To the contrary—
artistry and entertainment offer invaluable forms of communications between cultures. Our
concern is that this particular film sends the wrong sort of message to its intended audience.
Sincerely,
Kambiz Atabai

3dculturekid

3dculturekid

Amir, I guess my response is that this is a Hollywood production...and even the best Hollywood productions that try to stay historically accurate will always fall short of that goal. Second: Kambiz's review is from his point of view. You, I and everyone else shares a unique viewpoint on life and history based on a whole host of factors...so where his opinions may be true to his point of view, they may not be so to you or I. That being said, I never let the opinions of others dissuade me from viewing a movie, seeing a play, listening to a song, or watching a sunset. Instead I live life to view and enjoy and form opinions that I can stand and defend on my own legs, and not on the legs of others. Finally, It is true that not all of Iran hated (back then) or hates (today) Americans. I lived in Iran during the years before the Revolution and found Iranians very lovely and very friendly. I learned Farsi playing soccer and eating in the homes of my Iranian friends. A more lovely compassionate people could not be found. But in extraordinary times in history, even the most loving and compassionate people can at times be stirred by the passions of others to act in ways that they normally would not have otherwise. I think many Iranians got caught up in the revolutionary fervor that had they fully know the consequences would have gone great lengths to distance themselves from. So, my recommendation to you is to go see the movie. Enjoy it for the good telling of a suspense story that has its roots in a historical event. Understand that times have changed and that unlike the opinions of Kambiz and others does not further the stereotypes of yesteryear, but merely shows one person's interpretation of the events as they unfolded in those times. I would love to hear your opinion of the movie once you have seen it. I also invite others to comment on your question and my response.

SoosanKhanoom

akaDarya With life as short as a half-taken breath, don't plant anything but love. - Rumi

Great Article Thom ... thanks
I also agree with Esfand ... Looking forward to reading more of your posts here on the new site.

HSK
p.s... I received your message sent to me via youtube and I replied ... But did you get my reply ?

3dculturekid

3dculturekid

Darya, I just went and looked and sent you a reply. I look forward to building a friendship with you.

SoosanKhanoom

akaDarya With life as short as a half-taken breath, don't plant anything but love. - Rumi

Same here. Thank You ! I am also looking forward to check out your school yearbook... Hopefully I'll get reunited with my old American friends .

EsfandAashena

Esfand Aashena

This is very interesting. Have you followed iranian.com before? I hope you spend more time here. Also, you may want to post your blog as a blog rather than this News section.

It's your story so you can blog it here as well. Good luck.

3dculturekid

3dculturekid

Thank you Esfand. I do plan on writing more about my experiences in Iran. Like most everyone I find myself on the busy side of busy...but I do plan on setting more of my experiences down to share.