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The Iranian revolution continues; its terminus remains undetermined

Balatarin

 

The Iranian Revolution should be seen as a process. While (as with many revolutions) it is easy to date the end of the Pahlavi regime in 1979, it is harder to determine the terminus of the Iranian revolution, if one exists. This problem is not specific to Iran. For instance, there is a range of competing opinions about how to determine the terminus of the 1789 French revolution. Francois Furet analyses this ongoing disagreement by trying to identify the different endpoints of the French Revolution as posited by different historians. He sees these opinions as spread between two poles dividing past and future, from those who see the end of the French revolution as being synonymous with the termination of the old regime, since "the essential features of the Revolution's final outcome was fixed, when the final page of the ancien regime was turned" to the present time, when "the discourse of both Right and Left celebrates liberty and equality". For Furet, if there is a consensus among contemporary scholars, it is only because "the political debate has simply been transferred from one Revolution to the other, from the revolution of the past to the one that is to come". There are also other dates which are reasonable candidates for the revolution's end, the most of which range from 1794, when Robespierre was executed, to 16 May 1877, when republicans defeated the monarchists. Even between in between these, there are other possible "stopping points" at 1799, 1815, 1830, 1848, 1851, and 1870.[i]

The Iranian revolution is much too young to provoke such a wide range of disagreement about its terminus. However, we can recruit insight from the widespread disagreement about the French revolution by recognising that the "touchstone, in identifying the terminus of the French revolution is the realization of the guiding principles of the revolution". That is why today such disagreements have subsided since, as pointed out earlier on, "the discourse of both Right and Left celebrates liberty and equality". A similar line of argument can be used as a methodological device for defining the time period under inquiry, and judges the outcomes of the revolution according to its initially stated guiding principles of "freedom" , "democracy" "independence", "development" and "social justice". 

So far, we can argue that  the revolution actually evolved in three stages, each representing a different outcome: the short-term outcome ending in June 1981 when the first president was overthrown in a coup, which was characterised by its relatively democratic character; the medium-term outcome, ending with the election of Mohammad Khatami in 1998 and defined by its totalitarian character; and the long-term outcome, characterised by the ongoing struggle between dictatorial political forces and growing demands for the democratisation of the state and society through a strengthening civil society.  In other words and from this perspective, we can see why Michelet, the nineteenth-century French historian, described the moment of revolution in France in 1789 in the following way: "on that day everything was possible...the future was present...that is to say time was no more, all a lighting flash of eternity".
[ii]The refusal of Iranian society to take part in the struggle between ruling mafia families, the cracking and breaking down of the regime, and the presence of a democratic and independent alternative all provide us with both hope and opportunities to mobilize our resources to dismantle the regime and establish a dynamic democracy. This was the initial goal of the revolution; and until it is realised, the revolution continues.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=auL9PwjpLN8


[i] Francois Furet, Interpreting the French Revolution, transl. by Elborg Forster (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981), p. 3.

[ii] Kimmel, Revolution, p. 185.

Balatarin

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Fred

Fred

Please say Hi to Mr. Bani-Sadr and thank him & people like yourself for what we got in Iran now.
And please continue with your nonsensical essays, they might cure some insomniacs.

G.Rahmanian

G. Rahmanian

Mr. Delkhasreh,

You wrote:

"The Iranian Revolution should be seen as a process."

One can easily agree with the above statement by simply observing the continuation of massacres of Iranians by the Islamists ruling our country.

Zendanian

Zendanian An injury to one is an injury to all.

All Revolutions are complex social, historical processes, indeed.
Iranian Revolution of 1979, and the popular movement against monarchy, were instantly defeated on April 3, 1979, [12 Farvardien 1358].
Most common metaphor used in here is one of a stillborn child.
Popular uprising against monarchy was DOA, dead on arrival, because instead of replacing shah' dictatorial monarchy, with a democratic system, shah's rule was replaced by a Shia Theocracy ruled by a religious Caste.
Conquest of power by this religious Caste was a definite step backward for Iranian society, culture and history, not a step forward. This concept of a religious Caste was first observed and used by Workers' Path organization, (Raahe Kargr) in their description of IR.

However in the past 34 years Iranian Civil Society and all our progressive, contemporary social movements in Iran (women's, students, workers,...) have evolved, been augmented and have continued that democratic tradition of 1979. Iranian Civil Society and our contemporary social movements are once more positioned and poised to overthrow Islamic Republic of Hell.

The concept of Permanent Revolution is a most utilitarian and adequate concept in comprehending the current unfolding of Revolutions in: Iran, Middle East and North Africa, and through out the world. Cheers

SamSamVI

SamSam VI Path of Kiaan Ressurection of true Iran Hoisting Drafsheh Kaviaan

‍جناب محمود شکستخورده ...عمو توبه کن و برو سراغ کارت و یه نمیدونم پنچر گیری و یا کله پزی باز کن و بزار این نسل نو ایرانه ویران دستپوخت خودت و دووکتر سید بنی صدر الوقاص رو از نو درمون کنن.

Zendanian

Zendanian An injury to one is an injury to all.

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Zendanian

Zendanian An injury to one is an injury to all.

انقلاب چیست ؟
---------------
مارکسیسم و انقلاب در زمان ما! نوشته: ارنست مندل برگردان: ح. ریاحی
انقلابات به مثابه­ی امری قطعی در زندگی وجود داشته و وجود خواهند داشت. علت آن ماهیت ساختاری روابط تولیدی و مناسبات سیاسی قدرت حاکم است. دقیقا به دلیل این که چنین مناسباتی ساختاری اند و به دلیل این که این مناسبات به سادگی "پژمرده " نمی­شود – همین­طور هم به این دلیل که طبقات حاکمه تا به آخر در مقابل از بین بردن تدریجی این مناسبات مقاومت می­کنند- انقلابات برای از میان بردن این مناسبات اتفاق می­افتد.
http://nashrebidar.blogspot.com/2011/01/blog-post_26.html

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farhad8

farhad baz neshasteh hastam va ba zan neshasteh be omort dakheli koeh mirasam

من این تصویر را که نه صحنه ای که بتصویر کشیده شده را در سال 57 شخصا دیدم در خیابان شاهرضا حد واشط میدان فردوسی به سمت 24 اسفند .

This comment was removed by the Iranian.com Staff for violating our Commenting Standards

This comment was removed by the Iranian.com Staff for violating our Commenting Standards

SamSamVI

SamSam VI Path of Kiaan Ressurection of true Iran Hoisting Drafsheh Kaviaan

چرت و پرت نگو ...بازم رگ چاخان اخوندیت کرد..من کی به اسلام ناسزا(توهین) کردم ... به تخم تاز اره به امتی جهان وطنی اره به تخم عمر اره . از دید کیانی من پیامبر اسلام تا زنده بود گزندی به ایران نرساند و ایرادی برو نیست ولی عمر حروم زاده کرد و تا ابد عمر عمرو سگپدرو. خوش باشی و از چاخان فری