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Letters

August 21, 2004

* Censorship is evil

Cartoon in response to "Iraj should be banned" and "Enemies of freedom" >>> Here

Iraj Yamin Esfandiary

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* He says he is not Iranian!

How could you publish Agassi’s picture as the “Iranian of the Day” while has repeatedly denied he had any thing to do with Iran and Iranians. Has he changed his position?

We know his father was Iranian and fought in Olympic for Iran. But if he doesn’t want to be associated with Iran and Iranians, shouldn’t we leave him alone and let him do his commercials and be proud of nothing!

Arash Zarei

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* No contest

Dear Mr. Abadi, [It all disolved]

You bring many good points in your arguments about the Iranian military. There is no doubt that an honorable and respectable military is one that has the mandate of its people and therefore has legitimacy. I would just like to add to your points, as well as clarifications.

First of all, we Iranians should be proud that unlike most third world militaries, our regular armed forces for the most part, both before and after the revolution, have performed honorably and served their country. They did not commit war crimes, although they were in a position to do so many times and the other side had committed such crimes >>> Full text

An Iranian

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* IRI would rather keep the streets calm

With enemies both inside and outside our country we don't stand much of a chance [Not to be]. The result of the game was a foregone conclusion. But nowadays major sports events are not really about honest competition, athletism and sportsmanship but mostly about politics and financial power.

The IRI does not have the best interests of the Iranian nation at heart otherwise it would lodge serious complaints with regards to having two Arab referees in such an important game >>> Full text

Dariush Khatibi

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* Shiites and gay marriage

In his article, "Immoral and illegal", Slater Bakhtavar laid out his opinion on legality and morality of gay marriage. I will leave the question of morality of gay marriage to the moral, and instead concentrate on the legal aspect of it. Although Mr. Bakhtavar makes a convincing argument on illegality of gay marriage, his argument falls apart when you look at it from a constitutional point of view >>> Full text

Reza Safarnejad

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* Armed society is polite society

I read Sara Darcy's essay "Of guys and guns". I do not wish to be either disrespectful or flippant, but would like to suggest that there is an inextricable link between true political freedom from the oppression of the Central State and sovereignty over one's own homeland on the one hand, and the right to bear arms as articulated by the Founding Fathers of the United States in the 2nd Amendment. Hitler's Germany and Stalin's Russia are but two tragic examples from the last century regarding what despots and statist philosophies like Fascism and Communism can and will do in the face of unarmed citizens >>> Full text

Pastor Mark Dankof
www.MarkDankof.com 

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* Be careful

Dear Kamal,

You say that a Kurdish-Israel alliance is "natural" [Sweet sin]. Natural for Israel, yes, not for the Kurds. Israel has chosen to find allies in Kurdestan for the sake of weakening the region and making itself even more dominant and powerful. It is using the Kurds to spy on Iran and using Kurdish lands to train and gather intelligence. It even uses Kurdish land to send spy planes over Iran. It might even use Kurdish lands to launch attacks on neighboring countries.

Do you think that is in the interest of Kurdestan, to have attacks being launched from their territory so that retaliatory strikes hit Kurds rather than Israelis? You don't realize the Israelis are using the Kurds? Israel is using the Kurds to de-stablize the region, not empower the Kurds. Israel doesn't care what happens to the Kurds. Israel cares about its own future. The Kurds are only a means to their goals. Be careful who you ally with.

Dariush Abadi

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* So much gall

It is so sad to read what the author of "How about just doing your job?" has to say about Shirin Ebadi. Itís so sad it hurts. If the author is right, then I have missed just about the whole boat. If most Persians feel like her, then it will be a cold day in hell before I see self-rule in Iran.

How can some people expect so much from others??? According to the author, having won the Nobel Peace prize, Shirin Ebadi should have seeked immunity from a Western country, and given up her life to EXPOSE the regime >>> Full text

M Nesh

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* Not all are depressing

After reading the article "He's not Shahram", I felt I had to write and express my views (each to their own as said). I too was brought up in a different country, England to be precise. My musical knowledge was mainly classical (as I learned to play the piano) and also rock and pop. I went to concerts like Depeche Mode, U2, DEF Leppard (not deaf) and all the teeny boppers too like A-Ha and the New Kids. As I got older, I also went to see Cher, Tom Jones and even The Who >>> Full text

Leila Jerman

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* How about understanding her job?

Dear Ms Farhang,

It is incredibly sad that we are all in search of heroes to rescue us from badness regardless of their role [How about just doing your job?]. The fact that Ms. Ebadi received the Nobel Peace Prize speaks volume about her doing her job rather well as a human rights lawyer (How about just doing your job, August 4).

The Nobel committee recognizes Ms. Ebadi for her human rights efforts in Iran in the face of great adversity. In my book, that’s a great recognition for a job well done. To expect her to use this recognition to score political points against the regime in Iran misses her role as a human rights activist and cast her as a politician.

You may view both jobs as one and the same, but I beg to differ. Her role is to fight injustice by defending victims of unlawful acts, at least until she declares her candidacy for political office. You, on the other hand, are casting aspersions on her as a weak politician, clearly not her chosen role.

Let’s celebrate her past performance as a champion of human rights in a country with precious little respect for humans and their rights. When and if she announces her candidacy for office, then we can criticize her for not being bold enough with the regime.

Abtin Assadi

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* Not a word about Iran

It is always good to see that people who have supported the religious fundamentalism in Iran now are denouncing "extremism" in religion! [Shades of god] I wish Mr. Ala was a bit more honest in his dicussion of religious extremism and did not avoid the real issue: religious extremism that has destroyed national unity in Iran.

Mr. Ala is an Iranian and is writing this piece for Iranians. Yet, he does not say a word about Iran and goes as far as Dharfur in order to provide an example of extremism!  This would have been all right if he were not an Iranian or did not know about Iran.

Unfortunately, he is an Iranian who knows Iran too well! He has been supportive of the Islamic Republic for a long time (He may not be now or with this article he may be setting himself apart). He knows better! If he really means what he says in this article, he should begin disccusing religious extremism which has ruined Iran. I would have accepted his anti-fundamentalist arguement, if he had approached the issue more openly and honestly.

It is hypocritical to argue against fundamentalism everywhere but your own home! What keeps him from discussing that issue? Repeated trips to Iran? His open support for the Islamic Republic? The fear of arrest because he might have changed his view? Or, playing it safe by arguing agaist religious extremism everywhere, yet exempting the Islamic Republic!

Reza Sanjabi

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* Fed-up

Dear Dr. Mohammad Ala, ["Shades of god"]

The space of Iran is vividly supersaturated with religious propaganda. Many people, mostly young, are fed-up with clerics' propaganda. For example, you might have have heard that each time the TV stations commence their biased and prejudiced news programs with "BA SALAVAT BAR MOHAMMAD VA AL MOHAMMAD" a growing number of the listeners react by saying or signalling "GOOZ BE REESHE ..."

Isn't this an alarming sign of dangerous hostilities in future?

Normally, social crises start from overdoing simple and unnecessary things, which can be avoided without any dramatic consequence. But the persistence of some parties on their own beliefs triggers violence and generated unwanted reactions.

Masood Raji

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* Still a Communist after all these years?

Dear Ms. Maryam Namazie,

I have been reading your interviews on the Iranian.com and watching some of your programs aired on TV International English. I just can't figure how a young and intelligent person like you can still believe and support communism as an ideology after what was done in the name of this ideology in various parts of the World From the ex USSR to China and Cuba not to mention all the countries that have suffered behind the former Red Curtain >>> Full text

Darius Kadivar

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* Iran-Iraq war

Dear Sir,

I read your interesting article on Iranian.com [Gross hypocrisy]. You were certainly right to point out that Arab nationalism is more important than fellow Muslims to most of the Arab world. However, I was surprised that you didn't mention the Iran-Iraq war as an example.

Over half a million Iranians died in that war defending their country from invasion. Saddam used chemical weapons and was backed by the West as well as his fellow Arabs. Foreign fighters even came and fought for him against the Iranians.

Your point about America doing more for world peace than the Arabs is a correct one, but again the Iran-Iraq war demonstrated that the Regan administration was certainly more interested in putting down a revolutionary Shia Iranian regime than looking after the human rights of the Iranians. But none the less, America or the UK is far more a democracy and a better place to live than all the Middle Eastern states, and you make a good point about Arab nations being hypocrites and autocratic.

Mohammad Beyad

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* Bakhtiar deserves more

Bravo to Bakhtiar and to you for supporting him [Enghelaabzadegi-ye omoomi]. He was a dedicated and progressive free thinker. You are right, Bakhtiar deserves much greater respect and recognition.

Kamal Artin

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* Canada owes Kazemi nothing

In response to "Last Tango with Tehran",

Zahra Kazemi voluntarily went to chronicle the democratic movement of Iran's students. Ultimately, as Samira Moyyeddin pointed out, Zahra Kazemi gave her life because she believed that the democratic student movement in Iran was entitled to recognition.

A noble cause? Yes. But a cause that any intelligent person, especially one who is Iranian and acutely aware of the brutal realities of Iranian governance, would surely understand is a most dangerous undertaking. Like the Iranian government, I too will be so bold as to blame Kazemi for her own demise >>> Full text

Razin Shaikoli

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* Stop saying "Death to..."

Dear Qumars Bolourchian,

When I first started reading your article, I thought you actually believed everything you were saying [The British did It! ]. I thought you were one of those extreminist nationalistic Iranians who think their race is pure, the British control everything, and the Arabs are nothing but dirt and backward.

However, I was truly amused by your article. I realized you were trying to make a point that we Iranians tend to exaggerate events, and fill our lives with conspiracies in order to blame everyone but ourselves.

As I have always said, it is time to stop saying "Death to America, Israel, England, Shah, Khamenie, etc." and say "Death to OURSELVES, for letting them affect us".

I'm wondering if you could forward me what other people write to you about your article. I'm curious how many people believed what you wrote and took it as fact without checking for validity.

Dariush Abadi

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* Its got to be good

I mean no disrespect, but I like to know what kind of a goodies you guys smoke [The British did It! ]. It's got to be good to come up with something like this.

Thanks for the laughter, it has been a while I had not heard a good joke. I needed it today.

Mehrdad Mehranpour

P.S. Though I agree with W. is for WAR idea

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* Missed the obituary

The article "A new language?" shows once again, one person's:

1-Insecurity about being an Iranian and be mistaken for an Arab;

2- Grief for being alienated or separated from Iran and therefore desiring to resurrect an exotic link to him/herself;

3-And his reminiscing about the good old times in faraway kingdom named Persia has led to vilification of the word Farsi and yearning for all things PERSIAN or PERSIA.

No matter how much we evoke tradition and how much we reminisce about the good old times, we have to realize that PERSIA is no more, it's finished, done with, and it is buried in the historical backyard.

What we have now is Iran with its distinct language called Farsi. Persia died some time ago in 20th Century. You must have missed the obituary.

Ramin Tabib

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* Serious lack of self-worth

Oh for God's sake, will you PLEASE stop pestering everyone with your obsession over the Persian-versus-Iranian debate once and for all? [A new language?] THis obsession of yours is idiotic a psychological imbalance!

Look, the name of the country is Iran. It is NOT Persia. We Iranians have called it Iran for centuries. If the Europeans called it something else, that's their problem. People who want to change the name of Iran to Persian in order to impress foreigners by maintaining a tenuous association with 2000 year old past of the Persian Empire have a serious lack of self-worth. You don't protect your own culture by denying your own country's true name, or by over-emphasizing one side of it >>> Full text

John Mohammadi

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* Heartbreaking short sightedness

Dear anti-Shirin Ebadi authors,

1- I am afraid that I am stuck in Iran and cannot even find access to Shirin Ebadi's email address.

2- I have not been able to make the time for a proper comment on your article. i am just trying to interact briefly to make a rush alert towards the direction that your prespectives seem to take that appear to be self defeating towrds liberalism in iran >>> Full text

firoozeh derakhshani

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* We have seen 25 centuries of you

I am not surprized to see these Aryas [Iraj should be banned] and Daneshjoos [Enemies of freedom] complaining about Iraj's work. First of all since when critique of George Bush equals to defend of dictatorship and Islamists. Well only if you are supporter of Bush, defender of US attacking Iran and bringing the kingdom back, and a dictator in disguise yourself.

Let Iraj express himself through his work and you go find your own way of shutting people up? Thank God that you guys are not in any position of power otherwise no one else would be allowed to breath on this planet earth unless he was in your party of the king and voted for your military candidate. We have seen 25 centuries of you (as you say) and Iran is past the return point. Go get a life Aryo.

Goudarz Eghtedari

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* Iraj should be banned

Iranian.com is taking a wrong step by allowing supporters of Islamists to openly voice their opinions through art work on this forum.

One cannot combat a unrelenting dictatorship by giving them a free voice on this forum. Not even in the freest of societies are those endangering democratic elections allowed to advocate such policy. Dissent is allowed in democratic forums, but not when that very dissent promotes and endorses the very dictatorship that's suffocating our populace.

Iraj Yamin Esfandiary's cartoons take free forum policy too far and should be banned.

Arya Bakhtiar

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* Enemies of freedom should not be free

I'm one of several people complaining about Iraj's vastly anti-Iranian pro-Islamic Republic cartoons on Iranian.Com. Even in the United States those who threaten Democracy are not allowed a free forum to express their intentions, posting Iraj's cartoons is going too far.

Freedom of speech if one thing, but individual pawns of Iran's dictatorship should not be given a free forum to express themselves. One cannot achieve democracy when the enemies of freedom are given this opportunity.

Let's be fair to the people of Iran.
Daneshjoo

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* Religious freedom

I want to express my whole-hearted agreement with Dr Mohammad Ala regarding religious freedom ["Shades of god"]. He said, "If we want freedom to practice our beliefs, then everyone must have the same freedom, and all choices should be respected." How very true.

May I add that logically, the very use of force in support of a spiritual idea is an admission of bankruptcy. If a supposed truth is not able to affirm itself in an environment of liberty, then it almost certainly deserves to go into file 13.

Truth does not need an enemy as a reason to exist; she just is. She may be obscured for a time, but she will always arise victorious, bringing joy and freedom to those who love her and seek her. The sacred beliefs to which we entrust our eternity surely have more substance than to imagine that they can be thwarted or extinguished by the opposition of feeble little men. The aggressive zealot is often someone who needs to face the fact that his "beliefs" are actually nothing more than insecure religious/cultural dogma which he can only sustain by defeating those who disagree.

The most constructive thing we can do for the advancement truth, spiritual or otherwise, is to labour for that day when a Hindu or a Mormon or anyone else can preach what they believe on a street corner in Qom or the Vatican or anywhere else.

I hope Dr Ala has time to pursue this topic further in future.

Paul MacKinnon

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* The West "killed God"

Dear Muhammad Ala,

In your article, "Shades of god", you stated: "As has been often noted, in the course of history, more people have died in the name of religion than any other reason." This could not be further from the truth. It was an old European belief that religion was the root cause of all the death in the world. Europe secularized itself, and do you remember what happened?

In the course of World War I and World War II, the cause of "nationalism" and other forms of man-made superiority thoughts became the biggest cause of killing in the world. Millions were killed by nationalistic wars, and Jews were massacred in gas-chambers, not because of religion but because of ethnic pride and sense of superiority.

Communism massacred millions in the name of the common-wealth, and was against religion and God.

And ask the hundreds of thousands of Iraqi children that died due to US sanctions the past 14 years before the Iraq war. They didn't die because of any religious cause, but because of Imperialism and neo-Colonialism.

As Nietzche said, the West "Killed God", and now they are killing more without any religious belief.

Dariush Abadi

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* I was in Niavaran

I have always liked your pictures but you left a few good ones out! [Palace stroll] I was in Niavaran in 1983 (the last time I was in Iran) and despite getting in an argument with a bearded guard about not having stockings on, which made me mad, I was thrilled to see the statue of the Crown Cannibal's dad cut and destroyed (with only his legs remaining) >>> Full text

Azam Nemati

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* Another Texan, another war

Isn't it amazing that whenever this country has a president from "Texas" we have a war on our hand?

Johnson, a Texan, was war lovin' good ol' boy who went to great lengths to create the war in Vietnam and please his gun makin' buddies and oil friends. There are theories out there and books written about how bloody his hands were in Kennedy's assassination >>> Full text

Hamid Bakhsheshi

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* Who gives a shit?

After hearing this during the coverage of the grand opening of the Olympics in Athens, I was shocked. How F&*ked up can this be. How long are we going to sit back and watch the extremist Moslem destroy our country. Who gives a shit if his opponent is from Israel or any other country. This is the Olympics.

Filip Saprkin
Upset iranian

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* How little I knew

Dear Mr. Khodadad, [Persian Joan of Arc]

Your article was absolutely brilliant and inspiring to us women looking to our own history for role models. Your heart comes through your words. I was raised in what can be called a "conservative" Muslim family, where everything that was Bahai was called kaseef. Only in recent years do I see how little I knew about the marvelous things Bahai people have done and are doing. We look forward to reading more.

Nasrin Tehrani

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* Very happppppppppyyyy

You won't believe how much it means to me seeing [Hossein Kazerani] my dad's 1978 World Cup pictures in on your website. I have never seen these ones, my dad has got so many pics but not these. So I am sending them to him in Iran which makes him very happppppppppyyyy.
Thank you

Mana Kazerani

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* Arash is a hero

On 8/13/2004 BBC News published a story that told of the heroic act of Mr. Arash Miresmaili. Mr. Arash, who is the world Judo Champion withdrew from the olympic games in protest. He was scheduled to compete against an awful judo athlete who is a zionist terrorist.

Mr. Arash is a hero to all Iranians for protecting the human rights of the great people of Palestine. Reza Pahlavi, whose grandfather was a bald, illiterate idiot should learn something from Mr. Arash. Reza Pahlavi is so evil that he is in contact with the zionist terrorists. Even the UN has said that zionism is racism.

Reza Pahlavi should repent for his families sins. Reza Pahlavi should return all the money that his family stole from the Iranian people and the Iranian nation. Reza Pahlavi should renounce any intention of ever becoming king in Iran. Reza Pahlavi should stop saying he's Iranian because on Jeraldo Rivera's show he has said he is a permanent resident of the United States of America. Reza Pahlavi should become an American Citizen and drive a taxi cab for a living.

If Reza Pahlavi was a taxi cab driver his bald illiterate grandfather would be happy. Which grandfather from a backward village in Mazandaran would not be happy of such success?

Rahbary

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* MoreTahereh

Where can I find more information on Tahereh [Persian Joan of Arc]. I know very little about her life. My father would recite Tahereh poems. Jian made me interested to read more on her history and poetry. Please let me know what books I should read.

Ali Tabibian

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* Our childhood

Bahram joon, [Dokhtar-e hamsaayeh]

What can I say, I am struggling all my life, writing so many poems and short stories and now I have to admit you are the better one. I read them again and again and again, your story is not about children, it is about our childhood, any child in our land, so much nostalgia... Sink in the dream...

Love you lots,

Afsaneh Saghari

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* Panj tan

In reponse to quiz: "Panj tan"

1- Rafsanjani
2- Khamanei
3- Jannati
4- Shahrodi
5- Khatami

Reza

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* Inciteful hatred

Dear Sir,

I will be frank, I urge you not to post such ridiculously inciteful and hateful articles such as that authored by pesargol, titles " What do we have to be proud of " [Proud of what?]. I believe you have a wonderful site that presents a fairly balanced view of iranian affairs.

I am strong and dedicated muslim and reading such blatantly inciteful articles is truely offensive. We all have diverse political opinions on certain issues but there is no need to fuel division amongst countrymen. If criticisms are constructive and for the betterment of my country and my countrymen, I will support and even propogate them.

BUT, if criticisms are based on INCITEFUL HATRED, then I will be an a staunch opponent. If someone is to take advantage of flaws of the Islamic republic to attack Holy icons of the Shi'ite islamic faith, it is unacceptable. I thoroughly enjoy your site, it is both entertaining and informative. But as a matter of principle, if articles of such nature are posted, I will regretfully no longer visit your website.

Mehdi Ramezani

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* Keeping it real

I always look forward to viewing Mr. Davoodi's pictures . This time you have really done it [Faces of Tehran]. I loved the so many faces of my people with so many stories of hardship and endurance written on their faces. Yet, the hope vividly apparent in their shy smiles or those beautiful warm eyes >>> Full text

Azam Nemati

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* Reality check

Mr. Davoodi,

For some reason I was under this false impression that we Iranians are such a good looking nation in general [Faces of Tehran]. Thank you for bringing me back to earth... seriously. 

Back to regular programming... 

Kamal Marashi

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* Beating our own

What is all this Iran-bashing? [Unhappy campers] These olympiad events are nothing but a super huge advertising market, a big bazaar, if you will just like they have always been and the parade does not signify anything at all, to the extent that some athletes even choose not to attent so they can preserve their energy for a better performance. How could you expect something as infinitsimally insignificant such as this, to represent a country's overall integrity? >>> Full text

Kyle

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* Not bad, Evil!

In your response [Reason to be proud] to Pesare Gol [Proud of what?], you mentioned that: "There is very little - if anything - that the IRI has done of which one can be proud in this I agree with you." However, this could be further from the truth. Yes, revolutionary Iran, and the IRI it produced in the early days was nothing to be glorious about. However, during these 25 years the government has accomplished many things that the previous regime could not >>> Full text

Dariush Abadi

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* Leave us alone

All folks need to be proud of their achievements, it gives them energy to go forward, this includes Iranians too! now we should disqualify ourselves because we are passing through a dark part of or history? [Proud of what?]

Let me add this I hope mullahs with their Semitic dress code and behavior would join their brothers in holy land, do each other in, and leave us non Semitic folks to our own faith and away from their constant bickering and savagery integral to their culture...

zad ziead,

Panah

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* Perfectly said

Dear Houman, ["Reason to be proud"]

Thank you for your response to "Proud of what?" article in iranian.com. This article really bothered me but I was at a loss how to respond to it. You said it perfectly.

Regards,
Shahnaz Bakhshi
Baltimore, Maryland

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* Critique is not an assault

Dear Pesare gol, ["Few and far between"]

Instead of being agitated by constructive criticism ["Reason to be proud"], take it in the spirit it was offered.... I am astounded as to how you have managed to interpret my response to you in such a way to merit the reaction you have now provided! Where is this California Iranian business coming from? Did I ever say anything about THAT? When I say Iranian, I mean Iranian, I do not mean Iranian American, Californian Iranian or any other subdivision. It is all inclusive. In fact my exact phrase was; “I am proud that in Iran there are brave people who stand up against tyranny and corruption” >>> Full text

Houman Younessi

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* Few and far between

I am responding to Houman Younessi's "Reasons to be proud"]which was written in response to my article, "Proud of what?".

Younessi criticizes my grammatical mistakes and claims that my historical information with regards to Hafez were indeed wrong. I apologize for this as I wrote this article rather quickly and I am certainly not a Hafez historian.  But if you want to criticize someone for their writing skills you better be flawless yourself. This is far from the truth. Younessi's point number three is full of grammatical mistakes including run on sentences.

Younessi says that he is proud of many Iranians who have stood up against the IR regime. Sure, but they are few and far between. Among the seventy million Iranians how many have truly risked their lives, put in prison in order to fight against the regime? I would bet it is less than one percent.

Every year during the "18th of Teer" anniversary, out of the million Iranians in California, how many have the guts to come out and protest say in front of the UN office? Sure, buddy you have freedom fighters in that country but they are so few that the regime has successfully shut them up.

Finally, instead of making fun of the heroism of six year old who defended YOUR country, please give me a rational response as to why we Iranians celebrate actions of foreign figures instead of those of their own people. (See reply "Critique is not an assault")

Pesare Gol

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* Nader wins arguments, not votes

There are several problems with A. S. assessment [Nader anyone?].

1 -- Kerry has NOT signed on to Bush's "axis of evil" formulation. There is no indication that he is set on foreign policy of pre-emptive war. Indeed, it is quite the opposite. If the goal here to to make less likely that the US will invade Iran on an imperialist whim, then voting out the neo-cons who surround Bush makes the most sense. But is voting for Nader the best way to accomplish this? Bush supporters on't think so. They've been helping Nader when they can >>> Full text

Cam Amin

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* Struggle to save our culture

Mr. Younessi,

I read your reply ["Reasons to be proud"] to Pessare Gol's objective essay [Proud of what?] and found it to be somewhat condescending, to say the least. You chastise this compatriot by pointing out spelling errors for simply stating the fact that since 1979 we have lost our nationalistic pride due to a foreign borne, barbaric and archaic calamity named Islam. For your information Mr. Younessi, you need to brush up on the history of my noble Iran in order to digest what Nationalism truly is >>> Full text

Babak Kalhor

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* Forgetting Christians and Jews

This very unattractive chick must know that most people ignore her writings which is why she sits and writes (because she probably has no life) [No can do]. I have always ignored her because to me if the author has guts to put her/his picture with the material then she or he better look credible and that means having to look professional...

I do not know how long you have lived in the West but in 1979 I was constantly being approached by nice and attractive boys and girls who wanted to take me anywhere I needed (including hair dresser) and I knew there was a motive but could not figure it out. Until they asked me to go to a gathering and sure enough it was Bible study! They offered the bible in Arabic or Farsi whichever was easier. I laughed so hard and found it so sad that Christians resort to such tactics. Of course I developed a great strategy which works to this day >>> Full text

Azam Nemati

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* Voting for Nader means voting for Bush

It is amazing how one can publish such a meaningless article related the U.S. presidential election [Nader anyone?]. It would be nice that you note the abstract of my comment as follow:

1. You are telling to elect Ralph Nader, but no comments on what are his agenda.

2. The Iranian who have the right to vote in this country must be U. S. citizen, and therefore there are lots of internal issues is U.S. that should matter for them to vote for Kerry or Bush

3. You ignore the issue that voting for Nader means the support of the republican party, the same that in Iran people voted for Khomeini to get rid of the Shah, then you can see what is the outcome in Ian now.

Ray Lotfi

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* Becoming like them

Dear Ms. Sayeh Sirjani, [Bar maa cheh meeravad?]

Thank you for your note. Sorry I do not know you enough but from what you write I see that you are still under the influence of the negative aspects of my culture. We now live in the 21st century. We need to rapidly learn that even in talking with our enemy we need to follow a minimum of manner and style. Using ugly words specially in a letter written for public view is not respectable.

I understand that you are angry and frustrated by what IRI has done and is doing. Probably 90% of us Iranians are. Bt that does not justify us becoming like them. We need to expose the damages they inflict on Iran by facts and figures and not by bad mouthing. We live in the 21st century.

Mohamad Navab

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* Nader vote unconstructive

Dear concerned iranian! [Nader anyone?]

Frankly, after i was done reading your message of political activism to your fellow iranians, i was more baffled than before i had started it. it is clear that you support neither one of the major political parties's candiadates, but i really don't think casting a vote of protest for anyone would be very much indicative a communities's sense of involvement in politics, especially by those individuals who, in your very considerate and respectful tone are called our disgrauntled elderly relatives. i can promise you that you have just made the biggest blunder of your political career, if you ever wanted to have one (god forbid) >>> Full text

Kyle

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* Winner

I won. I won. I won. [Quiz]

Thanks.

Taravat Javadinia

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* Voting for Nader is the only decent thing to do

This article is right [Nader anyone?]-- we should all consider voting for Nader.

It's a reasonable protest vote. The Republicans after all were responsible for Toppling Massaged (President Eisenhower with Vice President Nixon [52/53]); and the Democrats (President Carter) were responsible for the Toppling the Shah and fermenting Islamic Fanaticism (in Iran & Afghanistan) and killing any chance for democracy in Iran for at least one generation.

Then to make matters worse, Reagan and Bush (Senior) paid off the Mullahs in October '81 to keep the hostages in place and humiliate Carter - with promises of money and arms (called the "October Surprise - topic of several best sellers -- now factually established beyond a shadow of doubt).

So Iran basically has been 'screwed by both sides' - not once but several times. Voting for Nader is the only decent thing to do. At least he is consistently pro-democracy and decency. The democrats and republicans have been hypocrites and liars when it comes to Iran. And in fact Iranian-American can actually be a deciding factor in several key states (with razor thin electoral margins) ...so it is not a wasted vote.

Bamdad

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* Yes! We're Central Asian

Dear Bamdad,

How very right you are [I'm... Central Asian]. Some twenty years ago, when I had moved to exile in Europe, I wrote a draft of my memoirs and sent it to an English friend who passed it on to the reader of a publisher. Her comment was that obviously Iran is much more of a Central Asian country than a Middle Eastern one (the memoirs were never published because it was druing the hostage crisis) >>> Full text

Fatema Soudavar Farmanfarmaian

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* Staying out of other countries' business

It is noteworthy for readers of iranian.com that Ralph Nader [Nader anyone?] and Michael Peroutka both oppose preemptive war on Iran and the agenda of the Project for the New American Century (PNAC). Peroutka is the Presidential candidate of the Constitution Party and will be on many more Presidential ballots in individual states than Mr. Nader.

As of right now, Mr. Peroutka is officially on the ballot in 28 states, including many of the key battleground states, and will achieve ballot access in approximately 14 more by the end of the individual state deadlines. Please review his site at Peroutka2004.com for informational purposes. His efforts have already been covered by the BBC, Al Jazeerah, Chronicles magazine, and Pat Buchanan's The American Conservative.

Mr. Peroutka brings back the best of the pre-World War II American Right--staying out of other countries' business and avoiding wars abroad based on a foreign policy of constant interventionism. It is also noteworthy that while he supports a strong American military, he opposes the reinstitution of a military draft in the United States and the inclusion of women in such a draft.

Thanks--
Mark Dankof

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* 28 Mordad

It is really disappointing that even Iranian.com presented nothing special in the anniversary of 28 Mordad, the day that changed the path in our history. We Iranians can learn many useful lessons from it.

Unfortunately most of us know little from our past so we have to repeat the mistakes we made.

Truely yours,

A. Saremi

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* Thank God

"Maylee nah Melli", a photo essay about dressing in Tehran tells what Tehran is really about today. The head scarf, "ro-saree" and chador have been accepted by Iranian women 100%. They wear it different ways to look sexy. Iranian women from the photos displayed show their smiling faces meaning they are happy with the Islamic Republic of Iran.

Since the monarchy was abolished Iranian women have advanced in life. There are more women in universities in Iran than men. The Shah was a sexist pig who had 3 wives, many girl friends and a homosexual lover named Ernest Peron. The Islamic Republic has once and for all liberated Iranian women. Thank God. 

Rahbary

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* When will men have the same guts?

I saw Mr. Schahram's excellent photo essay "Maylee nah Melli" on the way Iranian woman are modifying the dress rules, I thought I was seeing beutiful woman straight out of the Legends of a Thousand and One Nights. See this and this.

It is ironic to see that at the same time here in France there is a whole debate on dressing with the Islamic "foulard" or headdress in schools. It enthusiasts me and saddens me to see that these brave woman are in the forefront of National resistance in a smooth way while the damn male chauvinist Mullahs are taking measures to impose their national dress.

When will we get rid of this darn backward regime of turbaned towals and let the world see the beautiful aspects of our country including our brave woman and girls who have certainly the most suffered in the past 25 years? When will the men have the same guts? We do indeed have a wonderful examples of courage and determination.

From Shirine Ebadi to Empress Farah Pahlavi to the unknown woman of Iran we men need to learn and appreciate more the calm yet determined wisdom of these woman who will certainly one day take the destiny of their country in their own hands to the dismay of many us men. Maybe One day a Queen will reign on our country, it would be an irony in the long monarchical history of our nation,or maybe one of these young ladies will become president of a free and Democratic Iran.

There is an expression that "a Nation has the leaders it deserves", in the case of Iran it is the leaders who don't deserve its people especially its woman who constitute the majority of its population. Iran will rise from its ashes one day and glitter as its magnificent cities from Shiraz to Isphahan, from Mashad to Tehran, from Rey to Qom and blind the Men who have closed her in a black veil.

Our current opposition leaders should ponder that they have to count on this generation of Iranians who slowly but surely are changeing the way their Chauviniste male compatriots are thinking, without bombs, shells or weapons of Mass destruction.

Darius KADIVAR

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* Kurds Iranian origin

You make interesting points regarding Central Asia [I'm... Central Asian]. I guess you forgot an important point to mention that Kurds in all parts of Kurdistan (Iran, Turkey, Syria, and Iraq) are of Iranian origin, have been livinng in the the suggested geographical region for years, and have been seperated by artifical borders or containers.

Kamal Artin

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* One more thanks

I listen to the Persian music selections on Iranian.com every so often. Each time, I feel so grateful to you for your selfless contribution to my enjoyment: Thanks very much for the work you have done to make my enjoyment possible.

Heidar Modaresi

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* Lovely songs

Dear Azam,

I would like to thank you for your generosity to allow others  to enjoy Ali Sadeghi's songs as well. Like yourself, I really loved his "Kooche Baaghi" song. It brought back lots of memories.

Mahin Tafarodi

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* Taraanehaa

Baa dorod be shomaa,

Har iraani e aazaadeh va vatan dosti ke farhang e mosighi e melli dar rag o khonesh dar jariaaneh baayad be shoma khaanom e Nemati eftekhaar koneh. Be khaatereh in keh baa gharaar daadane mosighi e zibaai ke shomaa dar in saayt gharaar midid va talaash dar zendeh negah daashtane mosighi va Farhang e vatan e maa darid. Piroz o Sar boland baashid. tassadogh e shomaa

Abbas Motlagh.

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Archive
All past letters

By subject
August 2004

August 21, 2004

Cartoons: Iraj
* Censorship is evil
* 25 centuries of you
*
Iraj should be banned
* Enemies of freedom

Islamic Republic
* Becoming like them
* Save our culture
Pride
* Not bad, Evil!
* Critique is not an assault
* Inciteful hatred
* Few and far between

* Save our culture
* Leave us alone
* Perfectly said
Olympics: Israel boycott
* Who gives a shit?
* Arash is a hero
Israel-Kurds
* Be careful
Shirin Ebadi
* So much gall
* Understanding her job?
* Short sightedness
Zahra Kazemi
* Canada owes nothing
Bakhtiar
* Bakhtiar deserves more
1953 coup

* 28 Mordad
Dress/Hejab
* Thank God
* Men have same guts?
Cartoons: Iraj
* Censorship is evil
* 25 centuries of you
*
Iraj should be banned
* Enemies of freedom

Central Asian
* Yes! We're Central Asian
* Kurds Iranian origin
U.S. presidency
* Nader wins arguments
* Another Texan, another war
* Nader unconstructive
* Other countries' business

* Decent thing to do
* Voting for Bush
Homosexuality
* Shiites and gay marriage
Communism: Namazie
* Still a Communist?
Photos: Davoodi
* Reality check
* Keeping it real
* I was in Niavaran
Religion/Islam
* Not a word about Iran
* Religious freedom
* Fed-up
* The West "killed God"
* Christians and Jews

Bahai
* How little I knew
* MoreTahereh

Sudan
* Iran-Iraq war
Agassi
* He says he is not Iranian!
Persian/Farsi
* Missed the obituary
* Serious lack of self-worth

Guns
* Armed society is polite
Conspiracy: The British
* Stop saying "Death to..."
* Its got to be good

Military past & present
* No contest
Iran nostalgia
* Our childhood
Asian Cup
* Rather keep streets calm
1978 World Cup
* Very happpppyyyy
Dariush
* Not all are depressing
Music
* Taraanehaa
* Lovely songs
* One more thanks

Quiz
* Winner
* Panj tan

>>> More letters in August
>>> All past letters

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